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Six-page Typography · What hap­pened was, I ran across Bringhurst’s The Ele­ments of Ty­po­graph­ic Style and was in­stant­ly cap­ti­vat­ed, by the book’s beau­ty and al­so the pow­er of its mes­sage. So I’ve got ty­pog­ra­phy on my mind. Stand by for more on the sub­jec­t, but it struck me im­me­di­ate­ly that I’m liv­ing a ty­pog­ra­phy les­son at work, in the form of the fa­mous Ama­zon six-pager ...
 
Video and Speed · I’m sure you know the feel­ing  —  you see a link to some­thing that looks in­ter­est­ing, fol­low it, and when it turns out to be a video clip, you shake your head and kill the tab. The prob­lem with video is it’s just too slow. But some­times slow is OK, and maybe video can be fixed ...
[8 comments]  
Twitter Numbers · I still think Twitter’s in­ter­est­ing; it in­forms me and pleas­es me in ways no oth­er ser­vice comes near. Al­so, it lets me talk to the world, and when you do that, you find your­self ask­ing “is any­one listening?” For­tu­nate­ly, Twit­ter will tell you. The num­bers are big enough that the stats might be of gen­er­al in­ter­est. Of course, So­cial Me­dia Pro­fes­sion­als all have known all this stuff for years, but most of us aren’t those ...
 
Long-form Reviewing · This is a love let­ter to an au­to­mo­tive re­view, which turns out to be one of the best ap­pli­ca­tions of blog­ging I’ve ev­er seen. Specif­i­cal­ly, the “Long-Term Road Test” for­mat over at Ed­mund­s.­com ...
[8 comments]  
Paywalls Don’t Scale · Here’s the prob­lem: Every day I get emails about great of­fers ex­pir­ing re­al soon, bet­ter act now. They’re sub­scrip­tion deals from pub­li­ca­tions I most­ly like, but I’m not sign­ing up. I’d like to pay them though; here’s how ...
[13 comments]  
Money and Ads on the Web · My good­ness, the iOS-9 ad-blocker tech is rat­tling cages all over the In­ter­net. Here­with some links, in­clud­ing a cou­ple you like­ly haven’t seen, and one to a pos­si­ble so­lu­tion to the prob­lem, from Google ...
[5 comments]  
Google Music · I use iTunes at home, and oth­er­wise Google Play mu­sic, which re­al­ly isn’t ter­ri­ble. Since the Net is echo­ing with screams about Apple’s cloud-music prob­lem­s, now might be a good time for a few words on the sub­jec­t ...
[3 comments]  
Online Photos · I’d like to have my pic­tures on­line, and I’d be will­ing to pay for ser­vice. Here’s what I wan­t; I don’t think any of the Cloud Pho­to ser­vices pro­vide it, but I’d be hap­py to hear I’m wrong. [Up­date: There are lots of promis­ing tools on of­fer­.] ...
[7 comments]  
Missing the Cloud · I’m work­ing on my speech­es for the Go­to con­fer­ences lat­er this mon­th, in Copen­hagen and Århus, and I’m us­ing Keynote, and it’s the first time in a long time that my work lives pri­mar­i­ly just on this phys­i­cal com­put­er in front of me, and it’s mak­ing me ner­vous and un­hap­py ...
[9 comments]  
Styling More Pixels, with Beards · Our cam­eras put more pix­els in each pic­ture than our computers’ screens can dis­play. But the screens are catch­ing up, do­ing smart things with pix­els so small you can’t see ’em; Ap­ple says “Retina”, but ev­ery­one who ships things with screens is go­ing that way. Pub­lish­ing pic­tures on the Web so they look as good as they pos­si­bly on what­ev­er whoever’s look­ing is carrying… well, it’s hard. But I’m work­ing on it ...
[1 comment]  
Color Victim · I’m al­most ashamed to ad­mit it, but I’ve been en­joy­ing a Twit­ter stream called Every Hex Color; ev­ery ten min­utes or so it posts a 24-bit ran­dom num­ber which ex­press­es a red/­green/blue col­or val­ue ...
[2 comments]  
World Cup Tools · I’ve man­aged to take ad­van­tage of my between-gigs sta­tus to watch just over half of the World Cup match­es. To sat­is­fy my cu­rios­i­ty, I reg­u­lar­ly need­ed an­swers to two ques­tion­s: “What are the group standings?” and “What’s on today?” You’d think that FIFA.­com would be the place to find them, but you’d be wrong ...
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Hyphenation Lessons · I just made a bunch of changes to the site here, which should make it run faster with­out vis­i­ble ef­fec­t. The de­tails might be of in­ter­est to Web-tech and publishing-tech geek­s. Plus, words on be­ing sen­ti­men­tal about Perl code ...
[13 comments]  
Hockey Publishing · I just en­joyed watch­ing the first-round Finland-Canada hock­ey game from Sochi; the Fin­nish de­fense is awe­some, and Tuuk­ka Rask just about beat Cana­da single-handed. Al­so, they got­ta do some­thing about the ice qual­i­ty. But this isn’t about that, it’s about Wikipedi­a, once again beat­ing the world ...
[3 comments]  
CSS Drop Shadows · In ear­ly 2006, I added drop shad­ows to all the pic­tures here at on­go­ing; to do it I had to con­struct a 500-line Ja­va pro­gram. At the time I re­marked that CSS should just sup­port drop shad­ows, and now it does. Here’s how it look­s: ...
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Ads In Front of Things · They’re bad ...
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The Oxford English Dictionary · The OED means a whole lot to me; pro­fes­sion­al­ly, I owe it ev­ery­thing. My work on it was 26 (!) years ago, but then this spring I got an in­vi­ta­tion to their Sym­po­sium, which hap­pened last week, and there was on­ly one pos­si­ble an­swer. I’m pro­found­ly grate­ful they asked, and would do it again in a flash. This en­try, like the OED, is ex­treme in length and prone to ram­bling; but, I hope, al­so like the dic­tio­nary in that it might pro­vide plea­sure to peo­ple who like words for their own sake ...
[5 comments]  
Meta Meta Meta · On Sun­day I wrote On Medi­um about writ­ing on Medi­um, af­ter I post­ed a rewrite there of a piece I wrote about Texas pol­i­tic­s. Now let’s write about that ...
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On Medium · Last week I wrote Texas Pol­i­tics about the legislative-gamesmanship the­atrics around Wendy Davis’ fil­i­buster. It did OK on the blog, noth­ing spe­cial. Evan Hansen of Medi­um reached out ask­ing if I want­ed to re­pub­lish there. I couldn’t think of a good rea­son to do that, but then I al­so couldn’t think of a good rea­son not to. So here’s a blogger’s-eye view of be­ing a Medi­um au­thor ...
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Blogginess · Paul Ke­drosky, high­ly vis­i­ble In­ter­net/Money guy, tweets: “So strange to see peo­ple talk­ing about fu­ture of blogs in 2013. Blogs still exist?” (His own blog is now just a dai­ly tweet­pendi­um.) Paul’s smart, but that’s ridicu­lous ...
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News Fail · So yeah, I sat up till 2AM (Paci­fic, 5AM in Bos­ton), fas­ci­nat­ed by the sit­u­a­tion in Cam­bridge and Water­town. I lis­tened to the po­lice ra­dio on­line, watched a few live Twit­ter feed­s, and had a cou­ple Google Maps win­dows zoomed in on streets that I’d nev­er heard of but now know where they are: Hazel, Dex­ter, Lau­rel. The pro­fes­sion­al news me­dia knew less than I (3 time­zones away) did, but said more; some­where be­tween nau­se­at­ing and just sil­ly ...
[6 comments]  
Blog 4 $ · An­drew Sul­li­van, one of the world’s most vis­i­ble blog­ger­s, is go­ing in­die and will try to make a liv­ing at it. I wish him luck, but I think maybe he’s think­ing about it wrong ...
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Typographic Notes · No sto­ry to tell here, just a few notes for publishing-tech fan­s, which I guess is more or less ev­ery­one who does Web stuff which is more or less ev­ery­one. But if you don’t care about the dif­fer­ence be­tween re­al apos­tro­phes and “'” you can stop read­ing now ...
[7 comments]  
What’s Wrong With Twitter? · About fif­teen min­utes af­ter Twit­ter came on the scene, al­ter­na­tives start­ed crowd­ing through the door be­hind it. So far, none of them have re­al­ly made a dif­fer­ence. Why the crowd? ...
[3 comments]  
Statistics · Last night on im­pulse I spent a cou­ple hours script­ing and graph­ing and here’s a snap­shot of the brows­er and operating-system market-share num­bers as seen by this blog. The big trend is that there are no big trend­s ...
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Blogodammerung? · Jon Udell is blog­ging less. Gosh, so am I. There are loads of ways to talk to the world, new al­ter­na­tives ev­ery day it seem­s. Is this thing, you know, over? ...
[19 comments]  
No PC Involved · The words you are now read­ing were typed in on my Nexus 7, and pub­lished to the blog with­out the use of a tra­di­tion­al “Personal Computer.” First time it’s hap­pened, but maybe not the last ...
[4 comments]  
Tab Sweep (Non-geek) · Not all sending-the-world-a-link pub­lish­ing should van­ish in­to FaceTwim­blr+, me­thinks. So let’s batch a few up ...
[6 comments]  
Now With Schema.org Markup · If you’re look­ing at this in a Google+ link to its home on tbray.org, the snip­pet de­scrib­ing it should be ex­act­ly the same as the para­graph you’re now read­ing ...
[6 comments]  
Channel Choices · When I have some­thing work-related to tell the world, I have a lot of choic­es: This blog, @tim­bray, +Tim Bray, or (work-related, re­mem­ber), the An­droid Developers’ blog, @an­droid­dev, and as of this week, +An­droid Devel­op­ers. That last one, be­ing the newest, has a mere 25K cir­clers (although prob­a­bly more by the time you look); the cir­cler/­fol­low­er/­sub­scriber count of the oth­er chan­nels ranges up to the as­tound­ing 195K for @an­droid­de­v ...
[6 comments]  
Better Quotes Redux · Last week I as­sert­ed that prop­er left­/right quo­ta­tion marks are es­sen­tial, rec­om­mend­ed KeyRemap4MacBook to fix the prob­lem, and sug­gest­ed option-S, -D, and -F as map­pings for “, ”, and ’. Read­ers ob­ject­ed to all three and in­deed, I was wrong about two of them ...
[4 comments]  
Better Quotes · If you are pub­lish­ing text for peo­ple to read and you want it to look even halfway pro­fes­sion­al, you ab­so­lute­ly must use re­al ac­tu­al left and right quo­ta­tion mark­s: “quotes” not "quotes". Al­so right-single apos­tro­phe: as in don’t use “don't”. [Up­date: Please go check the com­ments, which are opin­ion­at­ed and full of use­ful al­ter­na­tives. I’ll re­port back af­ter fur­ther in­ves­ti­ga­tion.] ...
[23 comments]  
Analytics · For some years now, I’ve large­ly ig­nored the is­sues of how many peo­ple read this blog, where they come from, what tech­nolo­gies they use, and so on. But to­day I took a side-trip in­to Google An­a­lyt­ics and I found the num­bers in­ter­est­ing, so maybe you will too ...
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Two Maps · I’m pret­ty re­lent­less about adopt­ing new tech­nolo­gies and usu­al­ly un­re­gret­ful about the ones left be­hind. In par­tic­u­lar I have grave doubts about whether the “book”, I mean in its pa­per for­m, has or even de­serves a fu­ture. But there are two sides to this sto­ry ...
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Reading the Economist · I mean The Economist, which per­sists in re­fer­ring to it­self as a news­pa­per even though it phys­i­cal­ly ap­pears to be a mag­a­zine. Wel­l, it does in­deed de­liv­er news and is print­ed on pa­per. Oop­s, maybe not. The mo­bile app ver­sion is out, and it’s no­tice­ably bet­ter than the one in­volv­ing dead trees ...
[10 comments]  
Tisa · A cou­ple of days ago I switched the Neu­ton type­face in­to this space, via Google Web Fonts. I liked it but a lot of oth­ers didn’t, and it turned out that for some rea­son, on Win­dows it just didn’t work as a body font; I sus­pect it’d be fine for dis­play pur­pos­es (as in, for head­li­nes). So, on to Plan B: FF Tisa Web Pro, from Typekit ...
[13 comments]  
Somewhat Dutch-inspired · The full quote reads “Neuton is a clean, dark, some­what Dutch-inspired serif font which re­minds you a lit­tle of Times.” I just now stripped the old ser­if/sans choice out of my blog (less margina­li­a!) and dropped in Neu­ton for all the body tex­t ...
[15 comments]  
Things About Google+ · No, I haven’t fig­ured it out. Nei­ther has the rest of the world. Which means that now is a good time to write about it, while our im­pres­sions re­main plas­tic ...
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Reading Feeds · NetNewsWire and its au­thor Brent Sim­mons have been much in the news re­cent­ly. NNW’s fu­ture is a mov­ing tar­get, and that mat­ters be­cause the app mat­ter­s; it’s one of the bet­ter rea­sons to use a Mac ...
[20 comments]  
Tall and Narrow · As in, por­trait not land­scape. It’s the way to go. Which is to say, tablets should be held with the short bits at the top and bot­tom. And columns of text should be long-ish and narrow-ish. There are con­se­quences, in par­tic­u­lar for tablet­s ...
[42 comments]  
Reflowing · Last month I re­jig­gered the pub­lish­ing sys­tem here, mak­ing the text larg­er and wider and hy­phen­at­ed and jus­ti­fied. Now more: a bit of cos­met­ic change, a sig­nif­i­cant stylesheet sim­pli­fi­ca­tion, and a sub­stan­tial gain in ro­bust­ness. Plus, a les­son re-learned about the We­b ...
[8 comments]  
Reshaping · For the first time in years, I’m work­ing on chang­ing the look of this here blog. I’ve been bored with it in re­cent years, then Blaine Cook’s Beau­ti­ful Lines pushed me over the edge. As of to­day, if you’re read­ing this at tbray.org rather than in one feed read­er or an­oth­er, the text is jus­ti­fied on both sides and hy­phen­at­ed as nec­es­sary. There are side-effects, and I’m not sure I’m 100% hap­py with the re­sult­s. I am sure there’s lots more work to do ...
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More on Baking · There’s a flur­ry of con­ver­sa­tion among those who build and host blogs on the sub­ject of “baking”, i.e. caus­ing your blog’s pages to be served us­ing of or­di­nary “static” files stored on disk, as op­posed to as­sem­bled at re­quest time with calls to a database. Brent Sim­mons is sort of driv­ing; see A plea for baked we­blogs and More on baked blogs ...
[11 comments]  
Keynote ProTip: Two Start Slides · Here’s a re­al­ly small hyper-detailed rec­om­men­da­tion: If you’re us­ing Apple’s Keynote for pre­sen­ta­tion­s, make two copies of your open­ing ti­tle slide ...
[4 comments]  
Referral Information Loss · Late Sun­day I pub­lished Ten Th­e­ses on Tablets; it picked up a few high-profile links and re­fer­rals and went mild­ly vi­ral and as of now has been read (in a brows­er as op­posed to a feed read­er) 13,911 times. Who do you think might have sent those peo­ple? ...
[26 comments]  
On Books · Un­til this mon­th, I’d nev­er even glanced at an e-book. Now I’ve read three and can’t stop think­ing about where this is go­ing ...
[24 comments]  
Starting To Be Wrong · Every­body knows that de­sign­ing for the Web is not like de­sign­ing for print: The shape is flu­id not fixed, the font se­lec­tion is lim­it­ed, and there aren’t enough dots-per-inch to do prop­er ty­pog­ra­phy any­how; the ef­fect is that you have to give up fine con­trol over lay­out. Which was true un­til 2010 ...
[21 comments]  
Statistics Redux · For a few years, end­ing in ear­ly 2007, I used to do a month­ly (maybe even week­ly) up­date to a post en­ti­tled Statis­tics, which had pret­ty graphs sum­ma­riz­ing which browsers were vis­it­ing on­go­ing, and re­lat­ed in­for­ma­tion. After sup­per this evening I for some rea­son got in­ter­est­ed in this prob­lem again and made an­oth­er graph. There are tricky is­sues both of form (how I built the graph) and con­tent (what it says) ...
[5 comments]  
Communication Silos · On any giv­en day, I’m apt to com­mu­ni­cate elec­tron­i­cal­ly via the tele­phone, an In­ter­net VOIP equiv­a­len­t, email, IRC, IM, Twit­ter, and I might even write a blog post, like to­day. Why all these silos? Shouldn’t these con­ver­sa­tions be talk­ing to each oth­er? ...
[7 comments]  
OK, You Win · Dear com­menters and email­ers and tweet­er­s: All right al­ready. I sup­pressed the week­ly tweet-blobs from the Atom feed ...
[1 comment]  
Twitter Injection · Re­cent­ly in Blog & Tweet I ex­plained why I want­ed to make my Twit­ter his­to­ry a part of the pub­li­ca­tion you are now read­ing. Along the same lines, read Dave Win­er on the im­por­tance of the his­toric record and the gen­er­al good­ness of stat­ic files be­hind an Apache server. This post out­lines how it work­s, with source code, and draws a con­clu­sion ...
[9 comments]  
Blog & Tweet · If you blog and al­so are on Twit­ter or a com­peti­tor, I think that’s a prob­lem. Twit­ter doesn’t (yet) have a busi­ness mod­el, and doesn’t make it ter­ri­bly easy to re­fer back to the be­gin­ning of your tweet-stream, and the da­ta is full of frag­ile URL-shortener out­put. So it’s time to reel things in ...
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Fixing XML · A week or two ago, I was read­ing some­thing which in­clud­ed a re­al­ly sil­ly state­ment hy­per­linked to the Wikipedia en­try for XML. I fol­lowed the link and dis­cov­ered that the en­try was ap­palling­ly bad. I looked with a shud­der at the size and com­plex­i­ty of the bro­ken­ness and just failed to con­vince my­self that it was some­body else’s prob­lem. So we fixed it ...
[9 comments]  
You Have to Choose Who To Read · Is blog­ging over? Last year, Chris Wanstrath, one of the hottest de­vel­op­ers cur­rent­ly walk­ing, said to stop read­ing feeds and get back to work. A few weeks ago Twit­ter guy Alex Payne, in Fev­er and the Fu­ture of Feed Read­ers, con­sid­ered Chris’ ar­gu­ments; he isn’t sure that blogs are dead but says that feed-reading soft­ware is in ter­mi­nal de­cline. And then this week The New York Re­view of Books, which sits near the in­tel­lec­tu­al cen­ter of the English-speaking world, pub­lished The News About the In­ter­net by Michael Mass­ing; it more or less amounts to the main­stream of the writ­ing class rec­og­niz­ing that the bl­o­go­sphere, while im­per­fec­t, has im­por­tant things to of­fer ...
[4 comments]  
Is This Spam? · I still mod­er­ate all the com­ments here, but the set­up is id­iosyn­crat­ic enough that hard­ly any spam gets through. To­day, I’m pon­der­ing one par­tic­u­lar com­men­t, won­der­ing whether to ap­prove ...
[21 comments]  
Kindle Yourself · The pub­li­ca­tion you are cur­rent­ly read­ing is now al­so an Ama­zon.­com prod­uct. This means that for $1.99 a month you can read it on your Kin­dle in black & white ...
[9 comments]  
Less Like Oration · Noth­ing is more worth study­ing than hu­man dis­course. We are the language-using species and if we don’t un­der­stand how we use it we’ll nev­er un­der­stand any­thing. Re­cent­ly, cour­tesy of the Net, we’ve been us­ing it in small­er pieces which re­quire small­er in­vest­ments of time and at­ten­tion. Th­ese are new things; are they good things? [Warn­ing: long.] ...
[15 comments]  
Less Like Oration · Noth­ing is more worth study­ing than hu­man dis­course. We are the language-using species and if we don’t un­der­stand how we use it we’ll nev­er un­der­stand any­thing. Re­cent­ly, cour­tesy of the Net, we’ve been us­ing it in small­er pieces which re­quire small­er in­vest­ments of time and at­ten­tion. Th­ese are new things; are they good things? [Warn­ing: long.] ...
[15 comments]  
Carl for Printer · Check out Yes We Scan!, where my name ap­pears among those sup­port­ing a bid by Carl Mala­mud to drag the Unit­ed States Govern­ment Print­ing Of­fice in­to the cur­rent mil­len­ni­um. Carl is an hon­est and brainy guy whom I’ve known for a while, and the list of things he wants to do looks aw­ful­ly smart to me. Ob­vi­ous­ly I’m not speak­ing for my em­ploy­er and al­so I’m not even an Amer­i­can. So in this con­text I’m a self-appointed rep­re­sen­ta­tive of the Internet-using cit­i­zens of the world, who want the gov­ern­ments we pay for to make san­er use of the Net, and would be hap­py for the Unit­ed States to pro­vide us all with a good ex­am­ple.
[2 comments]  
On Paper · I got a book in the mail to­day that made me very hap­py. But the fu­ture of any­thing on pa­per is ob­vi­ous­ly lim­it­ed. My feel­ings about this are com­plex ...
[17 comments]  
Ephemeral Aggregators · I’m think­ing that The as­cen­dan­cy of Hack­er News & the gen­tri­fi­ca­tion of geek news com­mu­ni­ties, by Rab­ble, is, in its qui­et way, one of the most im­por­tant think pieces I’ve read in quite a while. It’s pret­ty clear that on­line ag­gre­ga­tions of in­di­vid­u­al con­tri­bu­tions are oc­cu­py­ing a big­ger and big­ger slice of the spec­trum of use­ful in­for­ma­tion sources. And al­so clear that this new land­scape isn’t sta­ble, but steadi­ly shift­ing un­der­foot ...
[3 comments]  
Better Feed Reading · Like many in­fo­s­phere na­tives, I deal ev­ery day with a mas­sive con­tra­dic­tion: On the one hand, I want to know what’s go­ing on out there, and on the oth­er, I want to get ac­tu­al work done. Re­cent­ly, the getting-work-done side has been suf­fer­ing. So I mas­sive­ly re­or­ga­nized my feed-reading se­tup, and it’s helped ...
[26 comments]  
The HTTP Sweet Spot · We seem to have pret­ty widespread con­sen­sus, these days, that HTTP, or per­haps the REST­ful ap­proach it ex­em­pli­fies, of­fers a pret­ty sweet sub­strate for push­ing and pulling da­ta around at Web scale. We got fur­ther ev­i­dence this week when a bunch of smart peo­ple stepped slight­ly out­side its sweet spot, in­to deep tan­g­ly weed­s ...
[8 comments]  
Death Online · This month has been nasty in the bl­o­go­sphere; as in sudden-death nas­ti­ness, best sum­ma­rized by Shel­ley Pow­ers in With Sad­ness. One of the de­part­ed, Ani­ta Row­land, was an oc­ca­sion­al con­trib­u­tor here, writ­ing me emails be­fore there was a com­ment sys­tem, for ex­am­ple to iden­ti­fy a cro­cos­mia and an iris. Bye, Ani­ta. What, then, about blogs and death? ...
[9 comments]  
XBRL News · Last week I gave a talk at the 16th In­ter­na­tion­al XBRL Con­fer­ence here in Van­cou­ver. XBRL is an XML-based sys­tem for pack­ing up companies’ fi­nan­cial in­for­ma­tion, and I think it’s re­al im­por­tant. But its take-off has been kind of pro­tract­ed and ar­du­ous. I was there as an Am­bas­sador From the We­b. Here’s a quick XBRL news overview ...
[5 comments]  
All About Electric Text · This is not ex­act­ly a re­view of Yan­nis Haralambous’ Fonts & En­cod­ings; that would be the work of years, and I doubt there’s any­one in the world qual­i­fied to dis­cuss the whole thing, ex­cept its au­thor. This new O’Reilly book is about a thou­sand pages in length. It’s im­pos­si­bly am­bi­tious, ir­ri­tat­ing­ly flawed, and prob­a­bly on­ly com­pre­hen­si­ble to a single-digit num­ber of thou­sands of peo­ple world-wide; but for those peo­ple it’s an es­sen­tial book, you just have to have it ...
[3 comments]  
Counting Subscribers · Rob Scoble is re­port­ing Google-Reader sub­scriber counts for pop­u­lar sites. Th­ese are in­ter­est­ing num­bers and (I sus­pec­t) a rea­son­ably use­ful met­ric of rel­a­tive pop­u­lar­i­ty. But some of the ev­i­dence is puz­zling ...
[1 comment]  
The Outage · I got an email from some­one, the on­go­ing com­ment sys­tem had blown up mys­te­ri­ous­ly. My log­files were weird­ly trun­cat­ed. Then the whole site just van­ished. The sub­ject of the email from sysad­min Mat­t: “So much for it not be­ing as bad as it looked....” ...
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Website Gems · It’s hard for cor­po­rate Web sites to be in­ter­est­ing. My feel­ing is that gen­er­al­ly, you’d like them to make it easy for peo­ple to find what they need, and oth­er­wise get out of the way. Hav­ing said that, there are two Sun-Web things that, just in the last week, gave me a big smile. First, FOSS Open Hard­ware Doc­u­men­ta­tion. One of the ma­jor ob­sta­cles faced by the peo­ple who build Free and Open-Source op­er­at­ing sys­tems (i.e. us, the pen­guin­istas, and the BSDer­s) is get­ting the hard­ware builders to pub­lish spec­s; his­tor­i­cal­ly, they’ve been fright­ened of those weird open-source hip­pies. Wel­l, we’re a hard­ware builder, and that page is try­ing to ag­gre­gate all the specs that kernel-builders might need. Si­mon Phipps tells me that this is a big job, with lots of le­gal due-diligence, and it’ll nev­er be com­plete. But at least a good start. Se­cond, check out this screen­cast about wik­is.­sun.­com. When this went by in the in­ter­nal email I skipped it—who’d watch a screen­cast about a wik­i? But hey, it’s good, check it out.
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Status Report · The pic­tures here, in their in­line for­m, are now all 400 pix­els wide, not 300; I think that looks a lot bet­ter. Did re­siz­ing them all ev­er burn a lot of CPU. Al­so, the side­bar has been cleaned up, there’s a soft­ware link there that con­sol­i­dates some bits of code I’ve emit­ted over the years; with a lit­tle homi­ly in the first para­graph, even ...
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Heard in Conversation · We were talk­ing about how to pub­lish some­thing or oth­er, and Lau­ren said “Well, if there’s a Face­book app for that, there’ll be a WordPress plug-in, too”. Sounds about right.
 
Sanitation · It’s amaz­ing how is­sues float to the top of mul­ti­ple minds in­de­pen­dent­ly. I’ve been spend­ing a lot of time think­ing about how to san­i­tize to-be-published data. Then Rob Sayre wrote In­ter­op­er­abil­i­ty and XSS Mit­i­ga­tion; XSS stands for “cross-site scripting”, the main threat that you san­i­tize to avoid. Sam Ru­by no­ticed got ac­tive: In­ter­op­er­abil­i­ty and XSS Mit­i­ga­tion an­nounced the San­i­ti­za­tion rules wiki-space. Microsoft’s Joe Cheng is wor­ry­ing, too ...
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wikis.sun.com · It’s been a lit­tle over three years since I an­nounced blogs.­sun.­com. Wel­l, wel­come to wik­is.­sun.­com and in par­tic­u­lar my cor­ner of it, The Tim Bray Sun-wiki Ranch ...
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Atomic Financial Publishing · Wel­l, the first-ever re­lease of a ma­jor pub­lic company’s fi­nan­cials via the We­b, in ad­vance of the con­ven­tion­al newswire ser­vice, is his­to­ry. It went OK, but we can do bet­ter. Ob­vi­ous­ly, these dis­cus­sions have been go­ing on for a while, and ob­ser­vant read­ers may have no­ticed I vis­it­ed Wash­ing­ton last March. How­ev­er, the go-ahead to do the num­bers on the Web came very re­cent­ly, and so the mech­a­nism was an or­di­nary RSS feed. We should pub­lish this in Atom, and do it over a TLS chan­nel, and sup­ply a dig­i­tal sig­na­ture. Stand by for next quar­ter ...
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mod_atom Status · Peo­ple who are in­ter­est­ed in the soft­ware shouldn’t have to read the acres of prose in the mod­_atom in­tro, so I’ll just keep this one up to date ...
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mod_atom · This is a stripped-down im­ple­men­ta­tion of the serv­er side of the Atom Pub­lish­ing Pro­to­col as an Apache mod­ule, im­ple­ment­ed in C. It felt like some­thing that need­ed to ex­ist and I am better-qualified for this par­tic­u­lar chore than your av­er­age geek; hav­ing said that, I have no idea if any­one ac­tu­al­ly needs such a thing. mod­_atom ac­tiv­i­ty can be tracked on this blog, for now, here. If any in­ter­est de­vel­op­s, then I’ll trans­fer dis­cus­sion to a blog at mod-atom.net which will be driven, of course, by mod­_atom ...
[17 comments]  
Good and Bad · A ques­tion oc­curred to me while I was speak­ing at the re­al­ly ex­cel­lent Seat­tle Event Apart; if you’re a Web de­sign­er and there’s one in your neigh­bor­hood, I rec­om­mend it high­ly ...
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Three blogs.sun.com Years · Wow, the launch feels like yes­ter­day, or a life­time ago. I liked the an­niver­sary com­ments from Dave “Mr. Roller” John­son and Lin­da “Ms. Keep b.s.c. on the air” Skroc­ki. Stil­l, all these years lat­er, I find my­self talk­ing reg­u­lar­ly to jour­nal­ists and pun­dits about Sun’s blog­ging ex­pe­ri­ence, and I’ve list­ed off the up­sides a mil­lion times but I don’t think I’ve ev­er pub­lished them here so I’d bet­ter fix that ...
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Contrib: I Give Up on Comments · I start­ed a di­a­logue here and it went some­thing like this. Tim: “I want to fid­dle the feeds to make the com­ments more visible.” Tim’s com­menter­s: “Go pound sand.” Well OK then, I won’t, for now. What I will do is, when I think there’s some un­fin­ished busi­ness com­ing out of the con­tri­bu­tions I’ll do a post like this with “Contrib:” in the ti­tle. Al­so, there were some good ideas that I’ll try to cap­ture in an im­proved com­ments feed. Al­so, I’ll try and fig­ure out a way to do some of what Sam wants. I’m look­ing for a metaphor to pin on Sam. Ca­nary in the coalmine? Princess and the pea? What­ev­er, he has good taste.
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Comment Updates · When I first threw the switch and opened the on­go­ing space to con­trib­u­tors, my Atom feed in­clud­ed com­ment counts. Thus, ev­ery time some­one com­ment­ed, sub­scribers saw the ar­ti­cle again in their feed-readers. This was un­pop­u­lar (check out the dis­cus­sion here and here) so I re­moved them. But now I’m un­hap­py with that de­ci­sion ...
[36 comments]  
Fair Disclosure · There’s a con­ver­sa­tion go­ing on about Reg­u­la­tion Fair Dis­clo­sure. Our own Jonathan Schwartz kicked it off last Oc­to­ber, call­ing for Reg FD to be re­vised to al­low the use of the Web to pub­lish ma­te­ri­al fi­nan­cial in­for­ma­tion. SEC Chair­man Chris Cox sur­prised a lot of peo­ple by re­spond­ing in a com­ment on Jonathan’s blog (I have a lot of time for Chair­man Cox, but I was sur­prised too). It turns out that there are those who don’t like the idea. This is a com­pli­cat­ed is­sue that blends Web tech­nol­o­gy with big-money busi­ness is­sues, and I’m in­ter­est­ed in what the peo­ple who read on­go­ing think; I sus­pect you in­clude some of the peo­ple in the world most qual­i­fied to have an opin­ion. [I sug­gest us­ing the tag “WebFD” if you’re go­ing to con­tribute in your own space.] ...
 
Who’s Got the Subscribers? · I saw a no­tice from Google that their blog-search robot will start re­port­ing sub­scriber counts. I poked in­to a re­cent log-file and found lots of agents do­ing this, so here’s a re­port with some num­ber­s ...
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Statistics · Some Sun­days I make graphs of statis­tics from the on­go­ing web-server log files. I find them in­ter­est­ing and maybe oth­ers will too, so this en­try is now the charts’ per­ma­nent home. I’ll up­date from time to time ...
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The Dash View · Hey, check out Anil Dash’s cool tab­u­lar cal­en­dar, sum­ma­riz­ing the his­to­ry of his blog. I liked it so much that I made one, too. Hm­m, I can think of lots of dif­fer­ent ways to or­ga­nize it, will have to try some al­ter­na­tives. Thanks, Anil!
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Comments Good · on­go­ing has had com­ments for a cou­ple of months now; I’m re­al­ly hap­py with the way it’s worked out, so, first of al­l, Thank you! to the peo­ple who are do­ing it; I checked this morn­ing and there’ve been 449 con­tri­bu­tion­s. The qual­i­ty is by and large high; for ex­am­ple, in the last day, Kill Switch Night­mare got a re­al­ly smart com­ment from Colin Jeanne point­ing out that for the bad guys, there may be eas­i­er and dead­li­er at­tack vec­tors than the Vis­ta/Of­fice “Kill Switch”. And some­what to my sur­prise, Bob Aman re­spond­ed to On At­tack­ing Iran, tak­ing the oth­er side of the is­sue and demon­strat­ing that not ev­ery­one who’s con­sid­er­ing this is a com­plete fruit-loop. Yes, they’re still mod­er­at­ed; I’d like to turn that of­f, but I watch ev­ery­one I know on com­mer­cial pack­ages burn­ing time and cy­cles bat­tling the ever-mounting spam wave, and I get scared. Call me a chick­en. Cluck-cluck. I’ve got a to-do list for a dozen mi­nor im­prove­ments, all sug­gest­ed by you (thanks!); I’ll get to them.
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The People Who Comment on Blogs · Now in­clud­ing the Chair­man of the SEC. That cool or what?
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DocWeb · This is Gosling’s lat­est hack, now on­line. In­ter­na­tion­al­iza­tion is a big hairy te­dious ug­ly nec­es­sary job, and if we can turn some com­mu­ni­ty mo­jo loose on it, that has to be a good thing. OpenOf­fice.org has done a good job of build­ing a com­mu­ni­ty around an in­ter­na­tion­al­iza­tion ef­fort, so we’re not start­ing from ze­ro. I’ll be keep­ing an eye on this.
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On Comments (II) · Thanks, ev­ery­one, for the high-quality dis­cus­sion and sug­ges­tions about com­ments and dates and up­dates and so on; if this were an IETF Work­ing Group, I’d be com­fy declar­ing “rough consensus”. I’ve made the ob­vi­ous changes; here­with a de­scrip­tion, along with gen­er­al re­marks on how this whole com­ment­ing thing is go­ing ...
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On Comments · I’ve had com­ments run­ning for a few days here now (I pre­fer to say “contributions”, but what­ev­er). Peo­ple are ir­ri­tat­ed at me be­cause an on­go­ing frag­ment shows up as un­read in their feed-reader when­ev­er a new com­ment comes in. I’m not sure what the right thing to do is. This piece out­lines a few op­tions and asks the com­mu­ni­ty for dis­cus­sion ...
[34 comments]  
The Ape · I’ve put up an Atom Pro­to­col Ex­er­cis­er at www.t­bray.org/ape. It might evolve to be­come a sanity-checking tool some­thing along the lines of the Feed Val­ida­tor. I don’t want to call it a “validator” be­cause a feed can be said un­am­bigu­ous­ly to be valid, or not; but a publishing-system in­ter­face might be un­us­ably bug­gy or slow or have mo­ron­ic au­then­ti­ca­tion poli­cies; all the Ex­er­cis­er (let’s just say “the Ape” for short) does is per­form a bunch of op­er­a­tions that a typ­i­cal APP client might, and re­port the re­sult­s. Al­so I’ve tak­en lib­er­ties in re­port­ing some things that aren’t cov­ered by the spec that im­ple­men­tors might want to know about. One of the most use­ful things the Ape does is pro­vide a com­plete trace of ex­act­ly what the client and serv­er sent back and forth to each oth­er; im­mense­ly help­ful as a de­bug­ging aid. Quite a few in­ter­est­ing war sto­ries have been com­ing out of the Ape-building pro­cess. I’ll keep this post up­dat­ed with the cur­rent Ape sta­tus. [Lat­est: i18n is back, and Elias Tor­res has a guinea-pig APP end-point to try it out on.] ...
 
Wrong Again · I re­peat­ed­ly ad­vised Jonathan not to al­low com­ments on his blog; “You’re an of­fi­cer of a pub­lic com­pa­ny, dammit,” I said, “the trolls and stock-pumpers and nazi pe­dophiles will have a field day, you’ll have to have three shifts of watchdogs.” Shows you how much I know; check out the com­ments on A Roof in Mid­town Man­hat­tan. Yeah, some are ob­vi­ous, par­tic­u­lar­ly at the top, but there are re­al sur­pris­es as you read on down. Got­ta get that on­go­ing com­ment cor­ral on the air.
 
Microformats Search · The Mi­cro­for­mats kids all have re­al­ly great hair, and the coolest acronyms; stil­l, up till now, it’s all on­ly oc­ca­sion­al­ly seemed plau­si­ble to me. But this new Tech­no­rati mi­cro­for­mat search thing, I look at it and for the first time re­al­ly think “This could be big”. For ex­am­ple, look at kitchen.tech­no­rati.­com/even­t/search/­van­cou­ver (even the URI is in­ter­est­ing). It looks like some “sort-by” but­tons and au­thor­i­ty and key­word fil­ters would im­prove things; and if this catch­es on some Mon­day the spam­mers will be there by Wed­nes­day. But stil­l, we could be see­ing it hap­pen: small pieces com­bin­ing to pro­duce some­thing re­al­ly, re­al­ly big. [Dis­clo­sure: I have a con­flict of in­ter­est with re­spect to Tech­no­rati.]
 
Comments on Comments · Last week I start­ed sketch­ing a de­sign for a com­ment­ing sys­tem, and asked for feed­back. I got lot­s, and I’m re­pro­duc­ing it here ...
 
Comments Please · I hope soon to be­gin im­ple­ment­ing a com­ment sys­tem for on­go­ing. This space is my note­book where I’ll work out the de­sign. Since, as of this writ­ing, the sys­tem ex­ists on­ly in the­o­ry, if you have a sug­ges­tion you’ll have to send me an email. I’ll pub­lish the help­ful ones. [Up­date: Tons of super-intelligent com­ments, in­formed by (some­times bit­ter) ex­pe­ri­ence. Thanks! I’ll pub­lish them, but a cou­ple of things emerge. First, I do have to plan to fight spam. Se­cond, I should have a look at camp­ing.] ...
 
Astounding, As Usual · Dave Sifry’s back with an­oth­er State of the Bl­o­go­sphere and the num­bers are, well, see the ti­tle. We re­main on track for ev­ery­one in the world to have a blog by 2009 or so. A mild gripe: Dave says “blogs” but he re­al­ly means “feeds”, a lot of them aren’t blogs at al­l. Stil­l, we’re up to 3.9 mil­lion of them be­ing up­dat­ed week­ly or bet­ter. The me­dia spec­trum is get­ting aw­ful­ly smooth, whether you’re talk­ing about the out­put of a multibillion-dollar me­dia em­pire or news from your brother’s fam­i­ly, they’re all just tabs in the ag­gre­ga­tor.
 
The Magic Middle · Dave Sifry’s post­ed Part 2 of the State of the Bl­o­go­sphere and this may be the most in­ter­est­ing chunk ev­er. There’s a lot more than just num­bers in there; what par­tic­u­lar­ly caught my eye was the no­tion of the “Magic Middle”, 150 thou­sand or so blogs with be­tween 20 and 1,000 in­bound links. Th­ese peo­ple tend to have a lot of very spe­cif­ic top­i­cal au­thor­i­ty and to be, in gen­er­al, good. Per­haps a new thing in the world?
 
nbextras.org · I ran across a cou­ple of blog point­ers to nbex­tras.org and thought it looked kind of cool and kind of use­ful and kind of lightweight, and I won­dered how it came to be here this week when it wasn’t there last week. So I chat­ted with Trung Duc Tran (he’s one of the se­nior peo­ple over in our Prague NetBeans shop) who put it to­geth­er with a cou­ple of oth­er co-conspirators and asked “How’d you do that?” Wel­l, it turns out that they found a cheap host­ing ser­vice and rent­ed a fake Xen-based serv­er and cob­bled to­geth­er the Jet­ty serv­er and the Peb­ble blog­ging en­gine. “It’s amazing”, Trung told me, “how much work you can get a servlet en­gine to do when you have all the da­ta in memory.” I asked whether it was a lot of de­vel­op­ment time and he seemed sur­prised, they’d dis­cussed it over lunch one day last week and set it up over the week­end and now it’s up. This Java/Web/Open-Source tech­nol­o­gy, it’s gonna catch on, you just watch.
 
The Aquarium · Peo­ple have been ask­ing for it since forever, and re­cent re­leas­es of Roller now have a group-blogging fea­ture. I’ve al­ways been skep­ti­cal of the idea, which re­de­fines “blog” from be­ing about an in­di­vid­u­al voice to be­ing about a shared in­ter­est; be­cause peo­ple are big­ger and more in­ter­est­ing than their in­ter­est­s. But over the last cou­ple of week­s, my at­ten­tion has sev­er­al times been drawn to pieces in The Aquar­i­um, which is a group blog about GlassFish. While I’m not re­al­ly an EE kin­da guy, I can see how some­one who cares about that stuff could find this kind of a re­source use­ful. For ex­am­ple, check out this point­er to an over-elaborated but nonethe­less use­ful ar­ti­cle about do­ing REST in in JAX. Maybe “group blogs” have legs.
 
Naked Conversations · Subti­tled How Blogs are Chang­ing the Way Busi­ness­es Talk with Cus­tomers, by Robert Scoble and Shel Is­rael. I got an ad­vance copy of this a cou­ple of months ago, with a note say­ing “Can we have a quote for the cov­er by Wednesday?” But I didn’t get around to read­ing it un­til sev­er­al Wed­nes­days lat­er. Sum­ma­ry: Lots of peo­ple will ben­e­fit from read­ing this; es­pe­cial­ly “Communications Professionals”. Most peo­ple who read on­go­ing won’t learn much, but they might en­joy it any­how. Read on for more de­tail­s ...
 
Top Posts · BlogPulse says that my lit­tle It’s Not Danger­ous squib was the twen­ti­eth most pop­u­lar blog post of 2005. That’s nice, but I tossed that off in about fif­teen min­utes in a flash of ir­ri­ta­tion at the wave of mo­ron­ic “fired-for-blogging” sto­ries. I sup­pose it mat­ters that it got trans­lat­ed. Stil­l, it’s lightweight. Want some­thing more sub­stan­tial? A few days lat­er, I wrote On the Ab­sence of Women, put my heart and hours of my time in­to it, then it sank like a stone, hard­ly a rip­ple. Or, go back to that BlogPulse list—interestingly, quite a few of the links are gone already—and for some­thing with ac­tu­al meat on it, check out #6 for an emo­tion­al wrench, #10 for a life lesson, or #25 for a wicked­ly good laugh.
 
Google Analytics · Here­with a re­port on a fairly-typical week of Google An­a­lyt­ics num­ber­s. I was go­ing to work this in­to the reg­u­lar week­ly statis­tics re­port, but I’m not at all sure I’m go­ing to go on run­ning an­a­lyt­ic­s, so as a sep­a­rate post this will re­main avail­able ei­ther way. [Up­date on screen sizes.] ...
 
Word Processing Blues · What hap­pened was, my man­ag­er want­ed a re­cent resumé for some in­ter­nal ad­min pro­cess­es. So pulled up TB-Resume.doc in MS Word; I first wrote it over ten years ago us­ing one of the stan­dard Word tem­plates pret­ty well out of the box, and it’s grown over the years, fol­low­ing me from com­put­er to com­put­er. It’s be­com­ing in­creas­ing­ly ir­ri­tat­ing to ed­it; in fac­t, it turned out that I couldn’t. [Up­date: Post­ed a tem­plate.] ...
 
Lightweight Authoring? · Jon Udel­l, in Beyond of­fice doc­u­ment for­mats, speak­ing of office-suite soft­ware like Word and OpenOf­fice Writer, voic­es a dream that I’ve heard time af­ter time: “A mere frac­tion of the pow­er of these multihundred-megabyte be­he­moths suf­fices for ba­sic com­mu­ni­ca­tion; the rest is over­head. Soft­ware de­liv­ered as a ser­vice through the Web—simple, lightweight, and uni­ver­sal­ly available—is clear­ly the bet­ter way forward.” Wel­l, yeah, but... au­thor­ing soft­ware is hard. I’ve used a lot of dif­fer­ent pro­grams over the years, and writ­ten some my­self, and I’ve nev­er seen soft­ware, de­signed for use by hu­man au­thors, that has good us­abil­i­ty and isn’t a great big honk­ing mon­ster. And usu­al­ly, they’re not on­ly big, but they take years and years to get work­ing prop­er­ly. So I re­al­ly hope Jon’s right, but I’m not hold­ing my breath. [Up­date: David Ber­lind is point­ing in the same di­rec­tion. I hope he’s right, too.] [Up­date: Jon fol­lows up.]
 
Blogapps on the Air · Dave John­son tells us this morn­ing that his ex­cel­lent Blo­gapps project is fi­nal­ly on the air over at Java.net. If you want to un­der­stand all this tech­nol­o­gy, here’s a great big wide deep pool of work­ing ex­am­ples.
 
Splogsplosion · Holy cow, I just wrote about splogs and over this week­end, they’ve ex­plod­ed. At eight when I looked at my PubSub feed, there were 31 en­tries, 30 splog. Just now at 9:45 there are 15 more. Tech­no­rati and Google feed search are sim­i­lar­ly in­fest­ed. The to­tal num­bers must be mind-boggling; this par­tic­u­lar surge is us­ing blogspot as an at­tack vec­tor. The soft­ware that’s gen­er­at­ing these things is pret­ty so­phis­ti­cat­ed, you might think they were re­al at first glance. Uh, ladies and gen­tle­men of the bl­o­go­sphere, I think we have an emer­gen­cy on our hand­s.
 
Splogs · I sus­pect most peo­ple nev­er see spam­blogs, but let me tell you, there are a lot of them out there and they get weird­er and weird­er and weird­er. I’m ac­tu­al­ly baf­fled as to why they ex­ist. The ev­i­dence sug­gests that if you can get emails in front of lots of peo­ple of­fer­ing pe­nis en­large­men­t, cheap mort­gages, fake Rolex­es, and stolen-money bank trans­fer­s, enough will bite that it’s worth do­ing so. But, as I said, most peo­ple nev­er see a spam­blog. When you see them, many have no ads at al­l. Of the ones you see that do have ad­s, the ads are to­tal­ly gener­ic, blah, un­in­ter­est­ing. Where’s the mon­ey? I sup­pose they’re vi­o­lat­ing the on­go­ing terms of use, but who cares, nobody’s see­ing it... I think. [Up­date: James Robert­son points out that in fact these things seem to be high­ly tar­get­ed at PubSub and Feed­ster user­s. Yep, that’s where I see ’em. Stil­l, it’s hard to imag­ine any­one ac­tu­al­ly read­ing them, still less click­ing on an ad. John Clin­gan emailed to sug­gest that these spam­blogs are good places to plant mal­ware, with the in­tent of in­fect­ing un­patched vis­i­tors via their browser­s.] [Up­date: Toi­vo Lainevool, who runs fight­splog.­com, thinks that splogs are try­ing to link to sites to boost PageRank, work­ing around link-farm de­tec­tion.]
 
Browser Market Share, Redux · As threat­ened, I re-ran my Brows­er Mar­ket Share num­ber­s, but re­strict­ing the anal­y­sis to peo­ple who came to on­go­ing as the re­sult of a search. It shows a pat­tern much more like what oth­ers in the in­dus­try are re­port­ing: In­ter­net Ex­plor­er has a large but steadily-diminishing lead. Here’s the chart, plus some notes on method­ol­o­gy and be­liev­abil­i­ty ...
 
On the Badness of MetaWeblog · Hen­ry Sto­ry has been strug­gling might­i­ly to turn Bloged from a week­end hack in­to a re­al blog­ging tool, be­cause near as I can tel­l, there isn’t such a thing that’s in Ja­va and works about the same ev­ery­where. This is good; what’s bad, as Hen­ry is find­ing out, is Me­taWe­blog; few APIs in my rec­ol­lec­tion have drawn such a unan­i­mous cho­rus of boos from im­ple­men­tors. Hen­ry lays the prob­lems out in gory de­tail. For­tu­nate­ly, we’re work­ing on the prob­lem.
 
Blogging Client Round-up · We’ve been fund­ing work on bloged, orig­i­nal­ly a Gosling week­end hack, and need­ed to check­point how it’s do­ing; so I went and tried out a bunch of blog­ging clients, with very mixed re­sult­s. So far I’ve test­ed ba­sic writing-in-the-browser, bloged, Ec­to, MarsEdit, and w.blog­gar. [Up­date: I’d mis­con­fig­ured Ec­to.] [Up­date again: I changed my mind and to­tal­ly rewrote the con­clu­sion; ain’t this medi­um won­der­ful?] ...
 
Aggregator Market Share · In re­ply to one of my Brows­er Mar­ket Share post­ings, Ian Brown wrote to point out that with an in­creas­ing por­tion of the traf­fic go­ing through news­read­er­s, it might be in­ter­est­ing to do some break­down on that. So I did. [Up­dat­ed to say the re­sults should be tak­en with a large grain of salt.] ...
 
Referrer Spamstorm · Near as I can tel­l, pret­ty well ev­ery somewhat-visible web­site in the world is see­ing its log­files fill up with with bo­gus page fetch­es there on­ly as a ve­hi­cle for a spam­mish “referrer” field; whether or not the site posts re­fer­rer data. This high-volume flood is a fair­ly re­cent phe­nomenon, and what makes it weird is that the vast ma­jor­i­ty of the bo­gus re­fer­rer sites are off the air due to some terms-of-service vi­o­la­tion. It would ap­pear that a sleaze­bag some­where launched a re­al­ly am­bi­tious as­sault on the whole world—using, I can on­ly as­sume, a few zil­lion zomb­i­fied drone machines—only to be found out and have their host­ing yanked while their mind­less slaves con­tin­ue to spew vac­u­ous ven­om in­to log­files ev­ery­where. Dam­n, the In­ter­net is a weird place. [Up­date: This was a big one, and lots of peo­ple stud­ied it.] [Up­date: I think I may have spo­ken with the per­p.] ...
 
Group Blogs? · We’re out there talk­ing to peo­ple about En­ter­prise Blog­ging, and one of the things we keep hear­ing is “We want to do group blogs.” Wel­l, the cus­tomer is al­ways right, so group­blog­ging is loom­ing larg­er and larg­er in the Roller to-do list. I’m sur­prised and un­con­vinced; out there in the world, group blogs are the ex­cep­tion rather than the rule. I sus­pect that there may be some ex­cess cau­tion at work; peo­ple a bit re­luc­tant to start talk­ing to the world feel­ing that do­ing it in a group con­text will be some­how less ex­posed. On this one, I’d ad­vise go­ing with the flow, and the flow to­day is most­ly about in­di­vid­u­al voic­es. But I learned long ago not to tell peo­ple what they should and shouldn’t want to do with tech­nol­o­gy.
 
TechWikiDoc · Jon Udell sug­gests a new doc­u­men­ta­tion strat­e­gy for tech­nol­o­gy ven­dors; rather than go­ing on pub­lish­ing in­com­plete, out-of-date, poor­ly writ­ten man­u­al­s, they could just set up a per-product Wi­ki and let the cus­tomer base fill it up with prob­lem­s, fix­es, workaround­s, tips & trick­s. As he points out, most of us have got­ten used to search­ing the Web for us­er re­port­s, rather than crack­ing prod­uct doc­s, to help us solve prob­lem­s. He sug­gests do­ing it at the Wikipedi­a, but I don’t think it mat­ters that much where the thing lives. Like many great ideas, it’s ob­vi­ous once you think of it. I’m quite sure it’ll hap­pen.
 
P@’s Snakeskin · Check out Pat Chane­zon on how to com­mu­ni­cate in busi­ness. The is­sue seems cen­tral and the prob­lems aren’t solved.
 
Podcasting · I may not en­tire­ly get it, but I can’t ig­nore it, so here­with some thoughts and pre­dic­tions on the sub­jec­t, plus ob­vi­ous­ly, a tee­ny lit­tle pod­cast ...
 
Weblogs.com Needs Help · As any­one who pings it knows, we­blogs.­com is not hold­ing up well un­der the strain of the blogosphere’s growth curve. To­day Dave Win­er is ask­ing for help in get­ting it re-engineered. He seems to be con­vinced that it has to be done in C; I wouldn’t be sur­prised if a smart PHP or Ja­va (Ve­loc­i­ty may­be?) im­ple­men­ta­tion could car­ry the load just as well. On the oth­er hand, for some­one who’s nev­er writ­ten an Apache mod­ule, this would be a sim­ple one, it’s a use­ful skil­l, and that’s about as close to the met­al as you can get. In any case, I’m pret­ty sure Dave’s right that it wouldn’t be a good idea for a big com­pa­ny (like Sun, for ex­am­ple) to step up and say “we’ll do it” be­cause the sus­pi­cion of cheat­ing from out­sider­s, and the temp­ta­tion to tilt the ta­ble a lit­tle for in­sid­er­s, would both be a re­al is­sue. A pity, be­cause a big com­pa­ny (like Sun, for ex­am­ple) al­ready has the in­fras­truc­ture to sup­port this and wouldn’t even no­tice the band­width. And a pity be­cause I al­ready know how to write Apache mod­ules and would like to learn Ve­loc­i­ty. I’m du­bi­ous that the no­tion of “one cen­tral place that ev­ery­one pings” is go­ing to hold up for the long ter­m, but for the time be­ing it’s use­ful and would be a good project for any­one with the cy­cles to spare.
 
PodPVR · Would it be an over­sim­pli­fi­ca­tion to say that Pod­cast­ing could turn the Net in­to a great big PVR? On­ly it’s not just video, for me the val­ue would be about mu­sic. So how about PAR? (Per­son­al Any­thing Recorder.)
 
In Virginia · I’m not, but on­go­ing is now, hav­ing moved three time­zones over from Van­cou­ver to a com­fy new Athlon 2200 with, they tell me, good con­nec­tiv­i­ty. Matt car­ried off the trans­fer with on­ly the slight­est of hitch­es, we’ll see how it goes. Should make ev­ery­thing much cheap­er, which was the point. Since we’re in meta­pub­lish­ing mod­e, read on for my lat­est browser-market-share num­bers and some notes on Google AdSense trend­s ...
 
Blogs and Wikis · Lots of peo­ple, both here at Sun and out there in rest of the world, like to talk about “blogs-and-wikis” like it’s one word or they’re one thing; I was re­view­ing the text of an up­com­ing book about the space to­day, and it as­sert­ed that “Obviously, the two are converging.” Huh? Grant­ed that they’re both about peo­ple plac­ing con­tent on the Web for oth­er peo­ple, but in their es­sen­tial na­ture, it seems like they couldn’t be more dif­fer­en­t. A wi­ki is a col­lab­o­ra­tive con­struc­tion en­gine, with refac­tor­ing and edit-in-place be­ing the dom­i­nant forms of ac­tiv­i­ty, and many equal voic­es singing in a cho­rus. A blog is more like a con­tent faucet, a source with one voice, al­ways grow­ing at one end; while up­dates to ex­ist­ing con­tent are OK, the dom­i­nant ac­tiv­i­ty is pour­ing new text and pic­tures and what­ev­er in. I sup­pose you can ap­ply syn­di­ca­tion tech­nol­o­gy to both, but I don’t see that much sim­i­lar­i­ty or con­ver­gence. At a deep lev­el, I don’t think blogs are re­al­ly a new thing in the world; but wikis are.
 
Rolling Out Roller · Back in Septem­ber I had a lot of fun speak­ing with the US In­tel­li­gence Com­mu­ni­ty. Talk­ing of­fline, they men­tioned that they were look­ing in­to de­ploy­ing blog in­fras­truc­ture and I told them we’d based the Sun in­fras­truc­ture on Roller, that it was work­ing out well, and that we were hir­ing its in­ven­tor. The in­tel guys said “Could he drop over and talk to us about it?” Seemed like a good idea, so Dave and Will Snow dropped by “somewhere near DC” and it turns out that what they want is sen­si­ble and doable, so we’re go­ing to do it and they’ll prob­a­bly use it. We’re very in­ter­est­ed in Cor­po­rate Blog­ging (this is an ex­am­ple, even if in­tel­li­gence pros don’t in­cor­po­rate). Is there any­one else out there think­ing about de­ploy­ing some en­ter­prise blog in­fras­truc­ture? Give me a holler.
 
Sun Gets Rollerized · Dave John­son, head Roller wran­gler, is com­ing to work for Sun. One of the re­mark­able things about Roller is that it’s all been built as an after-hours pro­jec­t. No longer.
 
How About a Date? · Over in Atom-land, we have all been ed­u­cat­ing each oth­er at in­cred­i­ble length (365 email mes­sages so far) on the sub­ject of the dates you at­tach to the elec­tron­ic what-nots you pub­lish. It has, like most ed­u­ca­tion­al pro­cess­es, been painful. I frankly can’t imag­ine who out there would care about this, but I need to get it out of my sys­tem. Plus it has a hu­mor­ous rhyming cou­plet ...
 
Purple Pilcrows · When ev­ery­one from Lau­ren to Aaron Swartz is whin­ing at me to make the #-marks go away, I have to lis­ten. I’ve adapt­ed Si­mon Willison’s bril­liant hack, and a cou­ple of re­marks are worth mak­ing ...
 
SOA Talk · I’m lis­ten­ing to Steve Gill­mor, Doc Searl­s, Jon Udel­l, Dana Gard­ner, and Dan Far­ber talk about SOA via “The Gill­mor Gang” at ITCon­ver­sa­tions. Here­with some ob­ser­va­tions on the form and con­tent ...
 
Purple Number Signs · Un­til this week­end I’d nev­er heard of “Purple Numbers” but they’ve been across the radar twice in the last day, first in some com­men­tary by Chris Dent on the Atom-Identifier is­sue, then again over at Jonas Luster’s place. First I thought, why not? Then, why num­ber­s? [Up­dat­ed: Backed ’em out for now, needs more work.] [Up­dat­ed again: put ’em back­.] ...
 
RGB Planes · Here­with three sets of 256 planes, each 256-by-256, rep­re­sent­ing slices of the 24-bit RGB col­or space along the red, blue, and green ax­es. There is a rea­son for do­ing this ...
 
LDW on WordPress · There’s an in­ter­est­ing write-up from Lau­ren on WordPress, in par­tic­u­lar some ob­vi­ous things that ev­ery soft­ware prod­uct ought to do but many don’t.
 
How Fast is This Thing Growing? · A lot of peo­ple would like to know ex­act­ly how fast this blog­ging/­sub­scrib­ing thang is ac­tu­al­ly grow­ing. Lots of peo­ple have seen the chart the Hum­mer Win­blad peo­ple are keep­ing of the “Feeds Watched” num­ber over at Tech­no­rati; about two and a quar­ter mil­lion on this first of May 2004. But the num­ber of peo­ple read­ing, as op­posed to pub­lish­ing, is at least as in­ter­est­ing. I de­cid­ed that Blog­li­nes.­com (which, by the way, any­one who watch­es this space ought to be keep­ing their eyes on) could be used as a sur­ro­gate for the gen­er­al growth of the whole area, and drew a graph ...
 
RSS Stock Ticker · I’ve said more than once that I’d like an RSS feed for my stock mar­ket port­fo­lio. I even cob­bled one to­geth­er a few months ago, but I lost it some­how in the laptop-to-laptop tran­si­tion. Now Wal­ter Hig­gins emails me: “prompted by your post last june on rss stock tick­er­s, and be­ing a dab­bler in stocks and rss my­self, I’ve been main­tain­ing a feed that mon­i­tors stocks and port­fo­lios. e.g. this will dis­play cur­rent val­ues for sun, mi­crosoft and or­a­cle while this will re­turn a rss feed for a port­fo­lio of 1000 shares of sun, 200 of mi­crosoft and 500 shares of or­a­cle. This feed in­cludes a to­tal port­fo­lio val­ue. This tick­er feed is re­spon­si­ble for most of my site traffic.” [Up­date: Some­one iden­ti­fy­ing him­self on­ly as “Mick” writes in to tell me about the recently-arrived RSSQuotes.­com, which claims to of­fer real-time quotes. Do­ing that for free is a neat trick­... I won­der about the busi­ness mod­el, but the site is information-free about who they are.]
 
I’m Internal Too · For those of you who work at Sun, there’s now an in­ter­nal ver­sion of on­go­ing at http://web­home­.sf­bay/on­go­ing/; check it out. Scoble says in­ter­nal we­blogs are in­trin­si­cal­ly less in­ter­est­ing than ex­ter­nal ones; we’ll see.
 
Vox Populi · Maybe ev­ery­one knows about Ra­dio Vox Pop­uli, but I didn’t. I don’t think I’ll make a habit of it, but it’s worth a vis­it.
 
Cleanup Plus Search · Another batch of on­go­ing house­keep­ing. I added a search field up and to your right, which just out­sources the prob­lem to Google. Even­tu­al­ly there’ll be some­thing with an on­go­ing look com­ing out of this. Al­so I fixed a long-standing bug in the date dis­play, which con­vinced me the whole date-hierarchy sub­sys­tem was ba­si­cal­ly bro­ken so I re-did it, check it out. Quite like­ly I broke some­thing, if so let me know, my email ad­dress is on the front page of a Google search for my name. Al­so, IE6 was re­fus­ing to ren­der ' prop­er­ly for rea­sons I couldn’t fig­ure out, so I skat­ed around that.
 
Topix · I got email from Rich Skrenta ask­ing me to take a look at Topix and maybe write a word or two about it. I have im­mense, huge re­spect for Rich, since he was the main man in cook­ing up Dmoz, and it had the po­ten­tial to turn the Web in­side out be­fore AOL bought and pissed in it (Dis­clo­sure: I got fired as a dmoz ed­i­tor for at­ti­tude prob­lem­s). He’s a mem­ber of the small Tribe Who Make Things Hap­pen. As for Topix... I dun­no. I’m pret­ty sure it’s worth the time it would take you to fol­low that link and look at it. It’s got a local-news fea­ture that might be great on­ly it doesn’t work for any­where unAmer­i­can which I am, so I di­aled up my fa­vorite place in the US, name­ly Port­land OR (the best book­store in the world and many mi­cro­brews, what’s not to like?) and that seemed pret­ty neat. As for the top page, it looked like a news­pa­per, a good news­pa­per, in fact a bet­ter news­pa­per than the lo­cal of­fer­ing for most peo­ple liv­ing out­side a huge metropolis. Topix hasn’t yet earned a spot in my visit-every-day list, which is pret­ty damn short since RSS came along... Rich tells me there’s a feed for ev­ery cat­e­go­ry, too. Hey, Skrenta him­self has a blog, and it looks good. Sub­scribed. He’s the on­ly oth­er per­son I’ve seen so far that’s no­ticed the insanely-expensive Google snip­pet ser­vice and drawn the right con­clu­sion­s; been mean­ing to blog about that but now I don’t need to. Skrenta he da man. Topix? Have your own look.
 
Xanada on Robertson · To­day from the always-stylish Xana­da, some words of wis­dom on the sub­ject of Be­ing Square.
 
The Web Death Penalty · There are a few things that a Web site can do that are un­for­give­able and should not be for­given. For ex­am­ple, I just un­sub­scribed from MacNN (as in CNN, get it?) be­cause on one too many oc­ca­sion­s, I fol­lowed a point­er there and there was this vi­o­lent­ly of­fen­sive ban­ner ad, flash­ing mul­ti­ple col­ors at a high rate of speed, and say­ing “If the link above is flash­ing, you have been se­lect­ed as a Win­ner! Claim here.” First of al­l, this is a lie, I have not been se­lect­ed as a win­ner. Se­cond­ly, it hurts my eye­s. Any Web site that runs this ad will re­ceive no more vis­its from me, it is way, way, way be­yond the bounds of what’s ac­cept­able.
 
On Bulleted Lists and Evil · The re­cent polemic against Pow­erPoint by Ed­ward Tufte (there’s a nice précis over at Wired) has been echo­ing around the idea­s­phere, with cov­er­age in the Times and in many blogs and mail­ing list­s. I’m a fre­quent pub­lic speak­er and care a lot about this; here­with some thoughts and ad­vice, along with a bit of rou­tine Microsoft-bashing ...
 
CSS Cowabunga · A cou­ple of mi­nor changes to on­go­ing in re­cent days, all in the CSS. First, if you cast your eyes to the right the nav stuff and pic­ture are no longer en­cased in soft green, that’s been ti­died away in fa­vor of just a line, which is ty­po­graph­i­cal­ly nec­es­sary be­cause of the ragged-right colum­n. That’s a one-liner: border-left: 1px sol­id #040;. Al­so, I switched the font to Ge­or­gia and twid­dled the siz­ing a bit for the serif pre­sen­ta­tion; if you sneered at it be­fore, give it an­oth­er try, I think it’s look­ing way bet­ter than the sans-serif ver­sion (y­ou have to hop off this front page in­to one of the ar­ti­cles to see the dif­fer­ence). This CSS stuff is go­ing to catch on one of these years. Nex­t, I need to dec­o­rate that pic­ture a bit, soft­en the edges or drop-shadow it or some­thing, it feels a bit naked hang­ing there in white space.
 
Taxonomy Madness · I ob­serve that many who like me hand-craft their pub­lish­ing set­up are kind of ab­ses­sive about tax­onomies, both their con­tents and con­struc­tion. Con­sid­er ex­am­ples chez Walsh (tax­on­o­my, ma­chin­ery), Pil­grim (tax­on­o­my), and Win­er (tax­on­o­my). Of course there’s al­so that link to your right la­beled What (but these days, I’m in­creas­ing­ly con­scious that I need to run through the whole es­say farm here and do some tax­o­nomi­cleanup). So, a rea­son­able per­son might ask: “Why all this tax­on­o­my work? What is it be­ing used for?” And I wouldn’t have a good an­swer. I’m not stop­ping, though. In­tu­ition is a per­ilous guide to en­gi­neer­ing ac­tion, but for now, this cer­tain­ly feels like the Right Thing To Do.
 
501 · I just no­ticed the es­say counter over at the top right had ticked past 500. Let’s coun­t... some­thing over two hun­dred thou­sand words since Fe­bru­ary 27, don’t ev­er let any­one tell you this writ­ing stuff isn’t ad­dic­tive. And thanks for read­ing.
 
Emergency Repair · Er, quite like­ly on­go­ing looks ter­ri­ble this morn­ing. There’s a javascript bug that I can’t quite shake out, but the quick an­swer is to hit ei­ther the "serif" or "sans-serif" links, which will clear it up.
 
Housekeeping · I have just switched over the on­go­ing soft­ware. It us­es ImageMag­ick in­stead of GD (bet­ter but slow­er, there’s no free lunch). Al­so there’s a print stylesheet, which has caused me much grief. It works kind of OK on some browser/OS com­bi­na­tion­s, but most mem­bers of the Mozil­la fam­i­ly present the print stylesheet on screen nice­ly, but blithe­ly ig­nore it when you ac­tu­al­ly print, pro­duc­ing a fac­sim­i­le of the narrow-columned de­fault page. Win­dows IE, when asked to print, sim­ply ig­nores all the CSS and pro­duces un­styled HTML, which while ir­ri­tat­ing ac­tu­al­ly works OK if you want to read one of my length­i­er ex­cur­sions on pa­per. I’ll shake it down even­tu­al­ly ...
 
Pardon the Breakage · If on­go­ing is act­ing weird, it’s be­cause I’m try­ing to switch in a new rev of the pub­lish­ing soft­ware, and the same iden­ti­cal HTML pages are act­ing weird­ly dif­fer­ent on my stag­ing serv­er and on on­go­ing and I have no idea why, and when I fig­ure it out, I’ll re­place this note with one telling you, of course, how great the new soft­ware is. Later: al­most got it to work; now De­bian ImageMag­ick is in­ex­pli­ca­bly fail­ing to deal with some but not all of my JPGs; OS X ImageMag­ick likes ’em al­l. We’ll get there even­tu­al­ly.
 
RSS, Advertising, Cheating · I re­cent­ly start­ed read­ing the RSS feeds from In­foworld, which con­tain ad­ver­tis­ing, my first ex­pe­ri­ence with this. Some gen­er­al im­pres­sions and a com­plain­t, but I think this may be the fu­ture ...
 
2003/9/11 · In San Fran­cis­co on that an­niver­sary, at­tend­ing the Sey­bold con­fer­ence. So far an OSCOM hackathon, a bomb threat, and some pure-California vi­su­al po­et­ry ...
 
SF Prep · I’m tak­ing off bright and ear­ly Wed­nes­day to go to the Sey­bold event in San Fran. I’ll spend some time to­mor­row at the Pie/E­cho/A­tom/What­ev­er Hackathon/Sprint, about which I know ba­si­cal­ly noth­ing; on Thurs­day Sey­bold is tak­ing a cau­tious look at We­blogs and RSS, I’ll be spend­ing quite a bit of time at that. In­ter­est­ing­ly I’m us­ing Apple’s Keynote PowerPoint-competitor for the first time, it’s pret­ty nice (ex­cept for I can’t drag pic­tures from my Apple-supplied brows­er in­to my Apple-supplied pre­sen­ta­tion); in par­tic­u­lar the po­si­tion­ing con­trol is ex­cel­lent and things gen­er­al­ly just look bet­ter, which is say­ing some­thing con­sid­er­ing that I start­ed with an im­port­ed Pow­erPoint tem­plate.
 
Schemaware for PEAW 0.2 · Here is draft schemaware for snap­shot 0.2 of PEAW (Pie/E­cho/A­tom/What­ev­er) ...
 
RSS Flow, Measured · Between mid­night and 11:07 AM on Satur­day Au­gust 2nd 2003, on­go­ing’s RSS feed was fetched 4,512 times, which is 6.76 times/min­ute, i.e. about once ev­ery 8.8 sec­ond­s. Add it up: that’s just over 128 MB/­day. This we­blog isn’t even in the top 100, if you be­lieve Tech­no­rati. Yow. [Up­date: Follow-up ques­tions from Bill Seitz and Brent Sim­mon­s]. [Up­date Aug 6: Fixed bug, bet­ter num­ber­s] ...
 
Schemaware for Pie 0.1 · I cooked up a Re­laxNG schema for Pie/Not-Echo or what­ev­er you want to call it, in its 0.1 snap­shot form. Which, as a side-effect, gen­er­ates a W3C XML Schema. This note in­cludes spe­cif­ic con­m­men­tary on this schema, gen­er­al com­men­tary on schemas (sum­ma­ry: Why would you ev­er use XML Schema?), and some rec­om­men­da­tions for prun­ing Pie/Not-Echo ...
 
Escaping and Learning · This en­try is specif­i­cal­ly about a par­tic­u­lar tech­ni­cal is­sue in the next-gen syndication-format de­sign ex­er­cise, but more gen­er­al­ly about the won­der­ful ex­pe­ri­ence of get­ting a bet­ter un­der­stand­ing of com­pli­cat­ed things. The les­son con­tin­ues... up­date #1 (skip to end). ...
 
Stamp Out Creativity Now · I am wor­ried that the next-gen syn­di­ca­tion pro­cess root­ed in Sam’s Wi­ki is in dan­ger of go­ing se­ri­ous­ly off the rail­s, be­cause some of the par­tic­i­pants have got the idea that it’s about try­ing to in­vent new tech­nol­o­gy or im­prove RSS ...
 
Explosion! · Sam Ru­by de­cid­ed that the way to de­sign the next gen­er­a­tion of Web syn­di­ca­tion was to cre­ate a Wi­ki, a dy­nam­ic web­site that can be edit­ed by, well, any­one, the on­ly re­stric­tion be­ing, er, um, in fact there aren’t any re­stric­tion­s. As any fool can plain­ly see, this can’t pos­si­bly work, ex­cept for it sor­ta kin­da seems to. It’s my first ex­po­sure to the world of Wik­i, and it’s been a brain-bender. Here­with some im­pres­sions and de­duc­tions and a close up view of a cre­ative ex­plo­sion in ac­tion ...
 
I Like Pie · Sam Ru­by has, over the last week or so, been qui­et­ly at the cen­ter of a lot of in­tense dis­cus­sion with the goals of clar­i­fy­ing what a “log entry” is, and now build­ing a roadmap around it. Now they’re ask­ing peo­ple to put up their hands and say whether they sup­port this or not. I sup­port it strong­ly, with (a typ­i­cal­ly lengthy list of) caveat­s, am­pli­fi­ca­tions and di­gres­sion­s ...
 
How to Identify a Log Entry · One of the more in­ter­est­ing pieces of the dis­cus­sion on the Buddha-nature of log en­tries (blog en­tries, what­ev­er) that was launched by Sam Ru­by is the no­tion of how to iden­ti­fy one. Var­i­ous ver­sions of RSS have strug­gled with this one, and I’ve fi­nal­ly de­vel­oped an opin­ion: URI and Ver­sion. (Up­date: Maybe #frag­ments are a bad idea.) ...
 
RSS: Promise and Peril · The smart peo­ple al­ready knew this, but I’m still just pick­ing up on it: RSS has huge busi­ness po­ten­tial. Here is a laun­dry list of a few things you could (and I think should) use it for. There are big-money im­pli­ca­tion­s. But there’s at least one big ob­sta­cle too ...
 
Pie · Ex­ten­sion? The no­tion of hav­ing a base set of re­quired com­po­nents and a bunch of op­tion­al ones grouped in­to mod­ules makes all sorts of sense. But why the word “extension?” Al­so, the phrase “Standard extension” grates a bit. Why not just say “optional modules?” I’m not a Wi­ki vet­er­an, if I were would I just go and bung this change in? ...
 
Blogs and Ink Under the Fingernails · For many years, the world of pub­lish­ing tech­nol­o­gy has gath­ered to talk and shop at the twice-yearly Sey­bold Sem­i­nars. This Septem­ber in San Fran there will be some we­blog­ging ses­sions, I’m go­ing and there are some open slot­s, check it out ...
 
Infoheavyweight · I spent a cou­ple of days last week in Or­lan­do at the Thom­son Cor­po­ra­tion Tech­nol­o­gy Sum­mit; 120 or so lead­ers from the many far-flung out­posts of the Thom­son em­pire; I did a keynote and talked up Visu­al Net. It was kind of a thrill for me, be­cause these are the peo­ple that XML was ac­tu­al­ly built for, and they live in the world of In­for­ma­tion and noth­ing but. Here­with a few words on the loud­est drum­beats in a tribe that feels like my own ...
 
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