The problem is, these days, that my input queues are jammed up. I’m reading Caesar: Life of a Colossus by Adrian Goldsworthy and it’s very good, but it’s awfully big and thick and dense. And my time for reading is tight because, after all, I’m married with two children and also I’m trying to read the Internet, or at least that huge little piece of it where people care about the things I do. And on that subject, once again I just have to plug NetNewsWire. I’ve tried a ton of newsreaders on a ton of platforms. Google’s blog reader is pretty good, and so are a couple of the other clients, but NetNewsWire just shows you more stuff in less time with fewer keystrokes. Years ago I predicted that feed-reading would have been sucked into the browser by now, but I was wrong. So between that and Caesar, and day-to-day job work, and a grungy unexciting complicated fill-a-hole-in-the-ecosystem programming project, well, I have Wikinomics and Everything is Miscellaneous and RESTful Web Services and the Programming Erlang PDF staring accusingly at me from the shadows. Blame Julius Caesar and Brent Simmons.



Contributions

Comment feed for ongoing:Comments feed

From: Carson Chittom (May 24 2007, at 10:48)

I must also recommend Goldsworthy's _Punic War_ -- fascinating stuff largely because it attempts, insofar as is possible (which isn't, very), to portray the Carthaginian perspective in addition to the Roman. For somebody like me, who studied Latin for three years in high school (and still can sort of read it (admittedly with much recourse to a dictionary and my copy of Wheelock)), whose whole experience was "Carthago delenda est," such a history is invaluable.

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From: Alper Çuğun (May 24 2007, at 13:37)

On the Mac, Vienna reads a mean RSS feed these days. It is fast and Open Source.

http://www.opencommunity.co.uk/vienna2.php

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From: Chris Stiles (May 25 2007, at 01:12)

Yes - but your computing power is generally moving with you - I suspect you are rarely away from your laptop. That's not the same for everyone, which is why those web based rss readers still make sense.

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From: Joe Germuska (May 28 2007, at 20:38)

Another nice thing about NetNewsWire is that it can synchronize with NewsGator, so that you can read feeds from the web if you need to, and then when you get back to NetNewsWire, they will not appear as unread.

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From: Sherri Caldwell - the Rebel Housewife (May 30 2007, at 05:46)

As a hopeless non-techie, Mom of 3, author/writer and avid book fanatic (I understand, I really do!), I've just watched while my techie-hubby downloaded NetNewsWire for me and I am impressed, too. I think I might finally be on the RSS, woo hoo! Of course, I have to delete all those Mac techie feeds and find my own...Regards, Sherri

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From: Owen (Jun 06 2007, at 04:00)

Sounds like a good book, recently very much enjoyed Tom Holland's Rubicon, on the end of the Roman republic, as well as just having got through Gibbon.

On NNW, have you gone for version 3 yet? I just did today and is still good but taking some getting used to.

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From: dbt (Jun 06 2007, at 22:44)

Let me know when you get to Erlang, I'm interested what you think of it.

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