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I Don’t Believe in Blockchain · There are con­fer­ences and foun­da­tions and con­sor­tia and trend­set­ter­s; it’s the new hot­ness! But I looked in­to blockchain tech­nolo­gies and I’ve end­ed up think­ing it’s an over­pro­mot­ed niche sideshow ...
 
Message Processing Styles · Re­cent­ly I’m think­ing about how we pro­cess mes­sages in net­worked soft­ware ...
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Susan and her SQL Problem · As usu­al, it all start­ed out in­no­cent­ly enough. Su­san [ed: names have been changed to pro­tect pri­va­cy] had no way to meet the dead­lines her boss­es had set for her. Bob had re­cent­ly and abrupt­ly left the com­pa­ny, and Melis­sa was on an ex­tend­ed med­i­cal ab­sence, leav­ing Su­san to do the work of three peo­ple. That is, three peo­ple each try­ing to rec­on­cile a few dozen 40,000+ row Ex­cel spread­sheets rep­re­sent­ing the gen­er­al ledger of the For­tune 1000 com­pa­ny they con­sult­ed for. She was about to brush off ever-chatty and an­noy­ing Michael from Com­pli­ance when, for on­ce, he rec­og­nized the stress she was un­der and said some­thing use­ful ...
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Another JSON Schema Gripe · Re­cent­ly I wrote of my dis­gruntle­ment with JSON Schema. Since then I’ve learned that its au­thors plan more work, and that there are sev­er­al oth­er ef­forts to build a schema fa­cil­i­ty for JSON. This note is just a com­plaint about a par­tic­u­lar use-case, with the hope that it might in­form these ef­fort­s ...
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Specifying JSON · I find my­self tasked with pol­ish­ing and pub­lish­ing a lit­tle cus­tom JSON-encoded lan­guage. It’s hard­er than it ought to be ...
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Getting the Picture · It’s like this: Aver­ages are your en­e­my be­cause they hide change. Mak­ing graphs is easy and cheap and some­times they un­cov­er se­cret­s; more of us should do it more ...
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RFC 7464, JSON Text Sequences · Here’s a nice lit­tle RFC de­scrib­ing a nice lit­tle trick that might even be use­ful. Short for­m: Peo­ple like to write JSON in­to log­files. Text se­quences make read­ing them eas­i­er and more ro­bust ...
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OSCON Rear-view · I spent three days last week at OSCON 2014 and en­joyed it. I’m not ac­tu­al­ly sure what OSCON means any more, but I hope it finds a way to stay vi­tal ...
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Discouraged Developer · I’m a soft­ware guy; I like writ­ing code. Over the last decade, my niche has been a mod­est amount of cod­ing and a lot of writ­ing about it. The size of my au­di­ence sug­gests that this is a rea­son­ably use­ful com­bi­na­tion. But I’m kind of dis­cour­aged and stuck at the mo­men­t. I’ll get over it, but the story’s worth shar­ing ...
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Java Pain · In 2014, it’s not OK if it’s hard for a de­vel­op­er to run a sim­ple pro­gram from the com­mand line ...
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What Programmers Do · I con­tribut­ed a morsel of code, con­nec­tive tis­sue link­ing two moderately-popular pieces of publicly-available soft­ware. The tech­nol­o­gy and cul­ture that en­able this? They’re the wa­ter and com­put­er pro­gram­mers are the fish, we can’t see it any more. By an ac­ci­dent of his­to­ry I could this time; and want to write about it ...
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JSON Redux AKA RFC7159 · The IETF has just re­vised its JSON spec; the new ver­sion is RFC7159  —  that link is to the IETF’s tra­di­tion­al line-printer for­mat, I’ve parked an HTML ver­sion at rfc7159.net for peo­ple who want to ac­tu­al­ly read the thing not just link to it. [Dis­clo­sure: I edit­ed RFC7159.] ...
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Software in 2014 · We’re at an in­flec­tion point in the prac­tice of con­struct­ing soft­ware. Our tools are good, our serv­er de­vel­op­ers are hap­py, but when it comes to build­ing client-side soft­ware, we re­al­ly don’t know where we’re go­ing or how to get there ...
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I Sold Some Bitcoins · I held the flim­sy scrap of print­out up to the Bit­coin ATM’s scan­ner, tapped its screen, and ten crisp hundred-dollar bills shot in­to the de­liv­ery tray at the bot­tom. Maybe Bit­coin is re­al? ...
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Tab Sweep · The tab­s! They mul­ti­ply like mag­nif­i­cent­ly mis­cel­la­neous mag­got­s! ...
 
What Does “App” Mean? · I’ve been Web-centric for a long time, and gen­er­al­ly thought of what pro­gram­mers build as “sites”. Then I was in An­droid and what ev­ery­one de­vel­oped was “apps”. Now I’m in a gen­er­al­ist role and, uh, a lit­tle un­clear as to how to refer, gen­er­al­ly, to what soft­ware builders build ...
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Golang Diaries II · I still haven’t writ­ten a thou­sand lines of Go; but what I have cre­at­ed does use­ful work and (con­sid­er­ing I had to learn a lan­guage and a bunch of li­braries along the way) didn’t burn that much time. Here­with an­oth­er batch of programming-permanoob re­portage ...
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Golang Diaries I · Some of the most pop­u­lar things on this blog have been di­aries I’ve writ­ten as I ex­plore my way through a new tech­nol­o­gy or hob­by. I’m pick­ing up the Go Pro­gram­ming Lan­guage, whose HQ is (sig­nif­i­cant­ly) at golang.org and which I’m go­ing to re­fer to as “Golang” for rea­sons which should be­come ob­vi­ous. What­ev­er you thing of Golang, it’s ap­par­ent­ly got some mo­men­tum and some se­ri­ous­ly smart peo­ple are work­ing on and in it; so this may ac­tu­al­ly be of ser­vice to the com­mu­ni­ty ...
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findIDP Tech Choices · I’m build­ing a ser­vice that us­es a bunch of heuris­tics to, giv­en an email ad­dress, fig­ure out which Iden­ti­ty Provider (IDP) you should try to use to log that ad­dress in. I’m do­ing it in Go. Here’s why ...
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Springtime Tab Sweep — Tech · Ouch, some of these tabs are old. Uni­fy­ing the­me: none ...
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Polyglot · Or in ful­l, the Van­cou­ver Poly­glot {un} Con­fer­ence. I saw it com­ing, thought it looked cool and that I’d go, then I got copied on an in­ter­nal con­ver­sa­tion where some­one sug­gest­ed we should spon­sor it. D’oh, good idea, why didn’t I think of it? So we are. So I’ll not on­ly go, I’ll sug­gest an un­con­fer­ence ses­sion on my cur­rent Iden­ti­ty ob­ses­sion­s. It’s a cool lo­ca­tion and they look like cool peo­ple; come on down!
 
I Bought Some Bitcoins · On Tues­day evening I gave an en­ve­lope full of hundred-dollar bills to a friend­ly long-haired young man I’d nev­er met in an undis­tin­guished coffee-shop in an undis­tin­guished neigh­bor­hood. By the time I got home, the Bit­coins I’d bought were worth no­tice­ably less than I paid ...
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Best Practices · That Steve Yegge is re­al­ly good at start­ing con­ver­sa­tion­s. Every­one in­clud­ing Steve thinks his es­says are way too long, but they’re in­sight­ful and eru­dite and fun­ny. His most re­cent out­ing, Notes from the Mys­tery Ma­chine Bus, is all of those things, and worth plow­ing through to the end. It’s al­so more or less com­plete­ly wrong ...
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Eclipse to IntelliJ · After two years I still loathe Eclipse, and my for­mer love NetBeans is now from a bad neigh­bor­hood, and more and more peo­ple I re­spect are switch­ing to In­tel­liJ Idea. So I thought I’d give it a try, since I’m just start­ing on a project that might grow large-ish. This is go­ing to be a di­ary of the ex­pe­ri­ence, heav­i­ly load­ed with GoogleBait in case oth­ers en­counter some of the same pain points that are in­evitable in such a tran­si­tion ...
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Network App Macroeconomics · A friend of mine is work­ing on a com­pli­cat­ed pub­lish­ing ap­p; the da­ta is XML, per­fect­ly ap­pro­pri­ate when your ob­jects are doc­u­ments. She told me they were think­ing about au­tomat­ing some of the work by run­ning XSLT trans­for­ma­tions out there in the client with libxslt. I said “Well yeah, as long as the client’s a PC not a tablet”. The cat­e­go­ry of “things you can do on a PC but not a tablet” is in­ter­est­ing ...
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Type-System Criteria · Start­ing some time around 2005, un­der the in­flu­ence of Per­l, Python, Er­lang, and Ruby, I be­came con­vinced that ap­pli­ca­tion pro­grams should be writ­ten in dynamically-typed lan­guages. You get it built faster, there’s less code to main­tain, and the bugs are no worse. I’ve felt neg­a­tive not just about statically-typed tools in gen­er­al, but about the Ja­va pro­gram­ming lan­guage in par­tic­u­lar. Liv­ing in the An­droid world has forced me to think about this more ...
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Geeks Gather in Belgium · I mean the 2011 Devoxx con­fer­ence, tenth in a se­ries, held in An­twer­p, oth­er­wise fa­mous for Rubens and di­a­mond­s ...
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DMR, 1941—2011 · Some things we now know to be good ideas: ...
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Chip Experience · Ba­si­cal­ly all the cred­it cards in Cana­da are now “chipped”, which is to say that there are vis­i­ble mi­cro­elec­tron­ics to­ward one end. To pay, you slip that chip in­to the read­er, con­firm the deal and en­ter your PIN. This al­lows for a sur­pris­ing amount of vari­a­tion in user-experience qual­i­ty ...
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Perma-noob · This week I’ve been learn­ing how one would build a sim­ple REST­ful back-end for an An­droid ap­p, us­ing Si­na­tra on Rack on JRu­by on Ja­va on App Engine and its Data­s­tore, by do­ing it. The app needs per­sis­tence and user-account au­then­ti­ca­tion, among oth­er things. It’s been stim­u­lat­ing, but I’m feel­ing wist­ful ...
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“Web” vs. “Native” · Back in Fe­bru­ary of 2010 I in­ter­viewed for a new job. It was the typ­i­cal Google hiring-process siege; I talked to six or eight peo­ple over the course of the day. At least half of them asked me “Native vs Web apps on mo­bile; what do you think?” ...
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Three Mobile-Software Rules · Th­ese days, I spend quite a bit of time talk­ing about how to write soft­ware for An­droid. I think three of the gen­er­al rules are worth ex­pand­ing on here be­cause I’m in­creas­ing­ly con­vinced they ap­ply to soft­ware in gen­er­al, not just for mo­bile de­vices ...
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Lightroom 3 · If I read the tea-leaves cor­rect­ly, this is in­creas­ing­ly the tool of choice among se­ri­ous pho­togs, al­though Aper­ture isn’t go­ing away any time soon. The new re­lease has been well-covered else­where; I don’t have too much more to ad­d, but I do have a ma­jor gripe and a cou­ple of pic­tures to il­lus­trate the much-ballyhooed noise-reduction fil­ter­s ...
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Modeling Is Hard · In A post-mortem on the pre­vi­ous IT man­age­ment rev­o­lu­tion Wil­liam Vam­benepe writes, on the sub­ject of stan­dard­iza­tion: “The first les­son is that pro­to­cols are easy and mod­els are hard.” I agree about the rel­a­tive dif­fi­cul­ty, but think when it comes to in­ter­op­er­a­tion, pro­to­cols are very dif­fi­cult and shared mod­els usu­al­ly im­pos­si­ble. A cou­ple of ex­am­ples oc­cur to me ...
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Lightroom Ping-Pong · Here’s the short form in geek-speak: Ap­par­ent­ly, you can use rsync to keep two com­put­ers run­ning Light­room in har­mony. The long ver­sion is well, long, and di­gress­es in­to Deep Vein Throm­bo­sis and Olympic Table-Tennis qual­i­fi­ca­tion ...
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Language Waves · I sup­pose I could have en­ti­tled this A Gen­er­al Model for Progress In Adop­tion of Pop­u­lar Pro­gram­ming Lan­guages. What hap­pened was, I was com­pos­ing a rant in­tend­ed for use in an in­ter­nal dis­cus­sion of de­vel­op­er fu­tures, and it dawned on me that there’s a re­peat­ing pat­tern in the waves of pro­gram­ming lan­guages that man­age to suc­ceed in find­ing broad us­age ...
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Tab Sweep — Tech · This goes back weeks and week­s; I’ve been wide-finding and do­ing Sun stuff and the Web-watching has suf­fered ...
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TestMaker · I got mail from Frank Co­hen say­ing “We just re­leased TestMak­er 5.0, could you give us a plug?” Hey, why not; I don’t know the first thing about the soft­ware so this is not an en­dorse­men­t, and the phrase “SOA Governance” gives me a mild wave of nau­se­a, but Frank’s a good guy, a long-time pro­po­nent of dy­nam­ic lan­guages on the JVM, and any­how the software’s Open-Source. Hey Frank, does it talk REST?
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Tech Tab Sweep · We’re all over the map to­day, from gen­er­al the­o­ries of soft­ware de­vel­op­ment to low-level op­ti­mized bit-banging. Wel­l, all over the soft­ware map, I guess ...
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Not Much New Here · In re­cent talk­s, I’ve been us­ing a graph­ic from State of the Com­put­er Book Mar­ket, writ­ten for O’Reilly Radar by Mike Hen­drick­son, and it’s been prey­ing on my mind. The more I think about it, and about the programming-languages land­scape, the more I think that this pic­ture isn’t chang­ing much any time soon. The land­scape is sta­ble ...
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Lightroom and Open Source · Over the last few years, I’ve be­come some­thing of an open-source tri­umphal­ist, drift­ing to the con­clu­sion that (on the en­gi­neer­ing side) it’s the best way to build soft­ware and (on the busi­ness side) it’s a bet­ter way to mon­e­tize it. I have to con­fess that Adobe Light­room has kind of shak­en my con­vic­tion­s. Cer­tain el­e­ments of its UI and de­sign (for ex­am­ple, the crop/ro­tate tool, and the non­de­struc­tive edit­ing paradig­m) are qual­i­ta­tive steps for­ward in the state of the art. Fur­ther­more, I can’t think of a sin­gle good busi­ness rea­son for Adobe to open-source it. I guess the con­clu­sion is ob­vi­ous: for the fore­see­able fu­ture, both mod­els of soft­ware build­ing and mar­ket­ing are go­ing to march along; nei­ther is doomed.
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Whither IT? · There are a cou­ple of brows­er tabs I’ve had open for at least a week now and they’ve been mak­ing me think and I think they’re re­lat­ed but I still don’t have a syn­the­sis. The first is Bill de hÓra’s Match­stick Men, which says a bunch of smart things about WS-* and REST, but that’s not what res­onates, it’s this: Crit­i­cal­ly the up­keep and main­te­nance of lega­cy sys­tems has come to dom­i­nate busi­ness soft­ware spend­ing. Most large en­ter­prise IT di­vi­sions now have the equiv­a­lent of a pen­sions fund cri­sis, ex­cept that all the mon­ey is be­ing spent on old sys­tems in­stead of old peo­ple. The sec­ond is Ni­cholas Carr’s Ci­ti whacks IT, from be­gin­s: In yet an­oth­er sign of the vast amount of waste in­her­ent in big-company IT op­er­a­tions... ...
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Lightroom Fanboy · I re­al­ly don’t of­ten use this space to blath­er on about how good some piece of com­mer­cial client-side closed-source soft­ware is, but, well... Adobe Light­room is a tru­ly great piece of work. Not on­ly is it just the thing for the se­ri­ous pho­tog­ra­pher, I think it may have ad­vanced the state of the GUI art ...
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Obie Says · That would be Obie Fer­nan­dez; he of­fers Some of My Soft­ware Opin­ions, and I rec­om­mend it hearti­ly. I agreed with al­most all of them; enough that I ful­ly in­tend to re-use them my­self.
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Defining Standards · In Pro Choice, Sam Ru­by says: I pre­fer sim­pler definitions.  A stan­dard is one that has mul­ti­ple, inter-operable, in­de­pen­dent implementations.  An open stan­dard, at least in the soft­ware world, is one where at least one of those im­ple­men­ta­tions is open source. You can sign me up for that, too.
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Interview, with Snarls · James Gray of Lin­ux Jour­nal has pub­lished a lengthy email in­ter­view with me. Those who vis­it on­go­ing reg­u­lar­ly won’t find much to sur­prise them; but I did take the chance to ful­mi­nate about das­tard­ly DRM and Microsoft’s odi­ous Of­fice XML. And now that I think of it, I’ve been stingy with the polemics around here re­cent­ly, maybe a lit­tle bland even; aren’t blog­gers sup­posed to be ruth­less at­tack pup­pies? It’s hav­ing a cute lit­tle girl ba­by around that does it I guess.
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Cars and User Interfaces · I can re­mem­ber, back in the day, when we were ar­gu­ing about us­er in­ter­faces we said “It should be as in­tu­itive as a car is. Any ex­pe­ri­enced driv­er can get in a new, strange, car and fig­ure it out in minutes.” Wel­l, I’ve been us­ing a bunch of dif­fer­ent com­put­ers and driv­ing a bunch of dif­fer­ent cars late­ly, and I think we’re there. With a sad pic­ture and some au­to­mo­tive micro-reviews ...
 
ORM Bien Phu · I thought the laugh line “Object-Relational Map­ping is the Viet­nam of Com­put­er Science” was an­cien­t, but Ted Ne­ward claims that he made it up in 2004. Ted has writ­ten an im­mense, de­tailed, es­say on the sub­jec­t, The Viet­nam of Com­put­er Science, which, just to be thor­ough, in­cludes a cap­sule his­to­ry of the Viet­nam con­flic­t. This ought to be re­quired read­ing for all Com­put­er Science un­der­grad­s, so they’ll at least be fore­warned be­fore they stum­ble in­to their own pri­vate South­east Asi­a. Bonus: in the com­ments, the first com­menter asks “If ORM = Viet­nam, does SOA = Iraq?”
 
Stiff’s Questions · A while ago I got an email out of the blue from Jarosław Rzeszótko, who’s from Poland I think, say­ing “I hope you don’t mind if I ask you a few ques­tions about software.” Then I ran across it again while look­ing for some­thing in my in­box on a plane ride, so I dashed off some an­swer­s; the per­son seemed pleas­ant and po­lite. He calls him­self “Stiff” and his blog “Sztywny Blog”. Any­how, he al­so heard back from Li­nus Tor­vald­s, Dave Thomas, David Heine­meier Hansson, Steve Yegge, Peter Norvig, Gui­do van Ros­sum, and James Gosling. The an­swers to his ques­tions are in­ter­est­ing.
 
On PHP · I should re­al­ly buck­le down and try writ­ing a PHP app be­cause, at the mo­men­t, I have an at­ti­tude prob­lem. I know that IBM now of­fi­cial­ly loves it, and Tim O’Reilly’s been chart­ing the up­curve in PHP book sales, and everyone’s say­ing that Oracle’s go­ing to buy Zend. If you want your ears bent back, have a lis­ten to Zend CEO Doron Ger­stel; he’ll tell you that half the web­sites in the world are pow­ered by PHP and that there are 2½ mil­lion de­vel­op­ers and that the war is over and PHP won. So here’s my prob­lem, based on my lim­it­ed ex­pe­ri­ence with PHP (de­ploy­ing a cou­ple of free apps to do this and that, and de­bug­ging a site for a non-technical friend here and there): all the PHP code I’ve seen in that ex­pe­ri­ence has been messy, un­main­tain­able crap. Spaghet­ti SQL wrapped in spaghet­ti PHP wrapped in spaghet­ti HTML, repli­cat­ed in slightly-varying form in dozens of places. Every­one agrees on PHP’s up­sides: it’s writ­ten for the we­b, it’s easy to de­ploy and get run­ning, and it’s pret­ty fast. Those are im­por­tant ad­van­tages. And I’m sure that it’s pos­si­ble to write clean, com­pre­hen­si­ble, main­tain­able, PHP; on­ly ap­par­ent­ly it’s re­al easy not to. But PHP has com­pe­ti­tion, most ob­vi­ous­ly Rail­s; and don’t write the Ja­va EE crowd of­f, they’re not stupid at all and they’re try­ing to learn the lessons that PHP is try­ing to teach. So PHP has earned everyone’s re­spect by get­ting where it is, and Sun should reach out to it more than we have. But in the big pic­ture, it feels vul­ner­a­ble to me. [Wow, I re­gret not hav­ing com­ments. There’s been some first-rate dis­cus­sion in email and on oth­er blogs. On this oc­ca­sion, I’m go­ing to cre­ate a vir­tu­al com­ment sec­tion by post­ing the good ones here.] [There is a new, good pro-PHP rant from Har­ry Fueck­s, and with that I’m go­ing to stop adding to this dis­cus­sion, un­less some­body says some­thing strik­ing­ly new. Thanks ev­ery­one! I’ve added a brief Table of Con­tents to try to bring some or­der to the chaos.] ...
 
Ultra Sysadmin · I’ve got this Ul­tra 20 which among oth­er things has a huge disk with room for lots of op­er­at­ing sys­tem­s. I want to fool around a bit with Lin­ux and So­laris Clas­sic and GNU/So­lar­is, run some Bon­nie num­bers and al­so shake down my own stuff on all these dif­fer­ent box­es. I ex­pect­ed pain, and I’ve al­ready had some. This post will be my di­ary of the things that go wrong, and right ...
 
Carlyle on REST & O-O · You wouldn’t think there’d be much new to say on the impedance mis­match be­tween the O-O & REST world-views, but Ben­jamin Car­lyle has a very good piece on the sub­jec­t, with lots of well-thought-out lit­tle side-trips. The blog’s called Sound ad­vice and a glance sug­gests that there’s lots more there worth read­ing.
 
Long Weekend News · While most of North Amer­i­ca was of­fline watch­ing fire­works or what­ev­er, the row of tabs across the top of my brows­er has been get­ting thick­er and thick­er with lit­tle news nuggets that I thought I ought to write about. Time to house­clean, so here are some in­ter­est­ing things you might have missed. Item: Eric Ray­mond says we don’t need the GPL any more. Item: Da­vanum Srini­vas points out that OSS im­ple­men­ta­tions of WS-Security may be im­pos­si­ble, founder­ing on the same rock that Sender-ID did. Item: The WaSP and Mi­crosoft, sittin’ in a tree (and as Scoble notes, ice is ob­served form­ing in Hel­l). Item: Ri­co con­tin­ues to pile up buz­z.
 
Threads Redux · The June 12th On Threads piece got slash­dot­ted (twen­ty thou­sand hits for a 2,300 word hard-tech piece, not bad), which pro­voked re­al­ly in­ter­est­ing feed­back from (a­mong oth­er­s) David Da­gas­tine, Greg Wil­son, and Ben Holm, along with point­ers to some re­lat­ed work. All those point­ers are worth fol­low­ing, and some of the points are worth a lit­tle more dis­cus­sion ...
 
On Threads · Last week I at­tend­ed a Sun “CMT Summit”, where CMT stands for “Chip Multi-Threading”; a room­ful of re­al­ly se­nior Sun peo­ple talk­ing about the next wave of CPUs and what they mean. While much of the con­tent was stuff I can’t talk about, I was left with a pow­er­ful feel­ing that there are some re­al im­por­tant is­sues that the whole IT com­mu­ni­ty needs to start think­ing about now. I’ve writ­ten about this be­fore, and of the many oth­ers who have too, I’m par­tic­u­lar­ly im­pressed by Chris Rijk’s work. But I think it’s worth­while to pull all this to­geth­er in­to one place and do some calls to ac­tion, so here goes. [Ed. Note: Too long and too geeky for most.] [Up­date: This got slash­dot­ted and I got some re­al­ly smart feed­back, thus this follow-up.] ...
 
Coding and Climbing · It had nev­er oc­curred to me that writ­ing soft­ware is like climb­ing Mt. Fu­ji, but Stephan Grell makes it all clear.
 
PhotoShop Elements 3 Review · Skip­ping to the con­clu­sion: It’s good, if you’re us­ing Ele­ments al­ready go up­grade. But along the way, there are thoughts on software’s lifes­pan and pric­ing. Plus, a thin black wom­an kiss­ing a flow­er taller than her­self ...
 
Software in the TLP Era · Fly­ing over the At­lantic, I read all eight parts of Chris Rijk’s Thread Lev­el Par­al­lelism De­sign De­ci­sions, and I wish a few more soft­ware geeks would go and read it. Here­with a few notes on soft­ware de­sign in the era of Thread Lev­el Par­al­lelis­m ...
 
It’s the Libraries, Stupid · Via Jeff Dil­lon, some in­sight­ful words on pro­gram­ming in Ja­va and in the C#/.NET/Mono ecosys­tem. I hadn’t thought about it that way.
 
Wondering About Vignette · I’d like to use the Web as a Real­ly Smart Library—first time I’ve done that on this blog—because I’m look­ing for some us­er and pro­gram­mer ex­pe­ri­ence on Vignette. I haven’t been near their prod­ucts for years, since the days of Sto­ryServer, which was gen­er­al­ly hat­ed for bug­gi­ness, ar­cane com­plex­i­ty, and TCL-centricity. If any­one would like to share some Vignette content-management or por­tal ex­pe­ri­ences, on or off the record, I’d sure ap­pre­ci­ate it, and I’d pub­lish them here too (or not) on re­quest.
 
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