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</TAG> · To­day I re­signed from the W3C TAG; the W3C Pro­cess Doc­u­ment is 100% crys­tal clear that a sin­gle com­pa­ny can’t have two rep­re­sen­ta­tives, and Norm Walsh is ably rep­re­sent­ing Sun. I’m sad, but not too sad. Sad be­cause this is a great bunch of peo­ple and it’s been a blast work­ing with them. On the oth­er hand, we got a lot of work done, in­clud­ing tak­ing our ma­jor de­liv­er­able to Last Cal­l. Al­so, the TAG is pret­ty time-consuming, and I think the new job is go­ing to con­sume more or less 100% of my time. Thanks for the good times, guys!
 
West England Web Architecture · I’m writ­ing this from the West of Eng­land: Bris­tol, to be pre­cise, where I’m at­tend­ing a face-to-face meet­ing of the W3C TAG. Here­with a few il­lus­trat­ed notes on the place, the coun­try, Cana­di­an His­to­ry, and the dread­ed Se­man­tic Web In­sur­rec­tion­ist­s ...
 
On Resources · This is not re­al­ly for gen­er­al con­sump­tion (although all are wel­come); it is a con­tri­bu­tion to a mas­sive, lengthy de­bate that has been swirling for a long time on the W3C TAG pub­lic fo­rum as well as the more IETF-centric URI talk shop. It’s just that on­go­ing not on­ly gives me a nicer writ­ing en­vi­ron­men­t, but gives the rest of the world a bet­ter read­ing en­vi­ron­men­t, than email. Par­tic­u­lar­ly if you use a bet­ter brows­er (if you’re read­ing this in IE, try on­go­ing in some oth­er brows­er fla­vor just as an ex­per­i­men­t). Any­how, it gets re­al tech­ni­cal and pret­ty ab­struse start­ing right here ...
 
High Throughput · In co-operation with Dave Or­chard of BEA, I’ve spent the last few days host­ing a face-to-face meet­ing of the W3C Tech­ni­cal Ar­chi­tec­ture Group here in Van­cou­ver. I’m pret­ty tired, since there’s been some heavy lift­ing, with a back­ground roar of al­le­gor­i­cal ar­tillery. But there are com­pen­sa­tion­s ...
 
Web Architecture, 2003/06/27 · The fruits of quite a bit of TAG labour over the last few months is now avail­able for your bedtime-reading plea­sure. I’m re­fer­ring to the lat­est draft of the Ar­chi­tec­ture of the World Wide Web which, when it’s com­plete, will al­leged­ly serve as the im­par­tial ar­biter for many thorny dis­putes and give guide­lines to the mad sci­en­tists who are think­ing up next year’s Cool New Web Stuff. Here­with a quick­ie overview guide as to what’s cooked and what’s not ...
 
Grinding Away on Webarch · I'm cur­rent­ly grind­ing away on a re­work of Chap­ter Four of the Ar­chi­tec­ture of the World Wide Web spec that we in the TAG are sup­posed to be de­liv­er­ing as one of our prime raisons-d’etre. I think this has the po­ten­tial to be­come a re­al­ly use­ful doc­u­men­t; I of­fer some rea­sons for that opin­ion, and a progress re­port on Chap­ter Four, with squeals of glee ...
 
RFC2396bis, Light Bedtime Reading · One of the many items caus­ing the W3C TAG’s in­put queue to bulge alarm­ing­ly is the re­draft­ing of RFC2396, cur­rent­ly in the hands of Roy Field­ing, to whom we all owe thanks. This is the doc­u­ment that de­fines what a URI is, of­fi­cial­ly, for the pro­gram­mers who build the We­b. A URI stands for Uni­form Re­source Iden­ti­fi­er (see Univer­sal Repub­lic of Love). It’s one of the three legs of the Web’s ar­chi­tec­tural tripod, and is very im­por­tan­t. You might want to re­view it in de­tail, like I am right now, but some ad­vance warn­ings are in or­der ...
 
Addressing For the Other Billions · Much time on the W3C TAG tele­con to­day on (I think) an im­por­tant is­sue: how to ex­tend the ma­chin­ery of the Univer­sal Repub­lic of Love, er I mean URL, er I mean URI, to the bil­lions who don't use our ninety-seven ASCII char­ac­ters to de­scribe the world. This is trick­y, not so much be­cause it's trick­y, but be­cause there's so much An­glo­cen­tric soft­ware out there that we have to cater to. (Warn­ing: severe­ly geeky.) ...
 
In the Web-Architecture Trenches · NDAs pre­vent me from talk­ing very much about my fa­vorite project at work, which is a pity be­cause it's re­al in­ter­est­ing: The world con­tains sev­er­al repos­i­to­ries of elec­tron­ic in­for­ma­tion whose size and val­ue are com­pa­ra­ble to the Web's, but which are gen­er­al­ly not use­ful­ly avail­able for search and brows­ing, but could be. We're work­ing on it. My TAG cy­cles the last cou­ple evenings have gone in­to the work-in-progress on re­draft­ing RFC 2396, which spec­i­fies what a URI (no, not URL) is ...
 
There's No Such Thing as a Web Site · The tech­nol­o­gy that makes the Web go doesn't have any built-in no­tion of a "site" or a "home page", even though that's how peo­ple think about things. This caus­es all sorts of prac­ti­cal prob­lem­s; the well-known /robot­s.txt mech­a­nism for crawler con­trol is kind of a kludge, and works re­al­ly bad­ly when mul­ti­ple sites are on the same server, for ex­am­ple mem­ber­s.aol.­com. Another symp­tom is the fact that it's kind of hard to find the RSS feed for a web site. Wel­l, we may be start­ing to ad­dress this is­sue over in the TAG ...
 
Writing Specs · In con­nec­tion with my W3C TAG work, in re­cent weeks I've pub­lished drafts or up­dates of three sep­a­rate pieces of standards-ware. Writ­ing these things is chal­leng­ing in a way that noth­ing else is ...
 
The TAG at Work · All day in a TAG Face-to-face meet­ing at UC Irvine, a love­ly spot in love­ly weath­er. Real grind­ing in the nasty ar­chi­tec­tural un­der­brush this time ...
 
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